sacrilege

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See also: sacrilège

English[edit]

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Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Circa 1300, original sense “stealing something sacred”. From Middle English sacrilege, from Old French sacrilege, from Latin sacrilegium, from sacrilegus (sacrilegious), from phrase sacrum legere, from sacrum (from sacer (sacred, holy)) + legō (gather; take, steal), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂k- and *leǵ-. Sense of “profanation” from late 14th century.[1]

Unrelated to religion, which is ultimately from ligō (I tie, bind, or bandage), from Proto-Indo-European *leyǵ- (to bind).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈsækɹɪlɪd͡ʒ/

Noun[edit]

sacrilege (usually uncountable, plural sacrileges)

  1. Desecration, profanation, misuse or violation of something regarded as sacred.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2022), “sacrilege”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From sacrilegus (sacrilegious) +‎ (adverbial suffix).

Adverb[edit]

sacrilegē (not comparable)

  1. sacrilegiously, impiously

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

First attested at the end of the 12th century, borrowed from Latin sacrilegium[1].

Noun[edit]

sacrilege m (oblique plural sacrileges, nominative singular sacrileges, nominative plural sacrilege)

  1. sacrilege

Descendants[edit]

  • English: sacrilege
  • French: sacrilège

References[edit]

  1. ^ sacrilège”, in Trésor de la langue française informatisé [Digitized Treasury of the French Language], 2012.