silex

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See also: sílex

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin silex.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

silex (countable and uncountable, plural silexes)

  1. (archaic) Flint.
  2. A finely ground relatively pure form of silicas used as a paint filler etc.
    • 1864, Fitz-Hugh Ludlow in The Atlantic
      Every little cold gust that I observed in the Colorado country had this corkscrew character [] an auger, of diameter varying from an inch to a thousand feet, capable of altering its direction so as to bore curved holes, revolving with incalculable rapidity, and armed with a cutting edge of silex.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin silex.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /si.lɛks/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

silex m (plural silex)

  1. flint

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Uncertain. Sometimes compared to silīgō and siliqua, both of unclear origin as well. De Vaan suggests that these are derivatives of silex, which have undergone a semantic shift “pebble” > “small pod”.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

silex m or f (genitive silicis); third declension

  1. pebble, stone, flint
  2. rock, crag
  3. lava

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative silex silicēs
Genitive silicis silicum
Dative silicī silicibus
Accusative silicem silicēs
Ablative silice silicibus
Vocative silex silicēs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • silex in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • silex in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • silex in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to pave a road: viam sternere (silice, saxo)
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “silex, -icis”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 564