stipend

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

The noun is derived from Late Middle English stipend, stipende (salary, wage) [and other forms],[1] from Old French stipende, stipendie, from Latin stīpendium (contribution; dues; impost, tax; tribute; military pay or stipend; military service), from *stipipendium, *stippendium, from stips (alms; contribution, donation, gift) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *steyp- (erect; stiff)) + pendere (the present active infinitive of pendō (to cause to hang down or suspend; to weigh, weigh out; (hence) to pay), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pend- (to pull; to spin; to stretch)) + -ium (suffix forming abstract nouns).[2]

The verb is derived from the noun.[3]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stipend (plural stipends)

  1. (archaic) A regular fixed payment made to someone (especially a clergyman, judge, soldier, or teacher) for services provided by them; a salary. [from 15th c.]
  2. (by extension)
    1. Some other form of fixed (and generally small) payment occurring at regular intervals, such as an allowance, a pension, or (obsolete) a tax. [from 16th c.]
      Coordinate term: pocket money
      My stipend for doing public service is barely enough to cover living expenses.
      • 1544 (date written; published 1571), Roger Ascham, Toxophilus, the Schole, or Partitions, of Shooting. [], London: [] Thomas Marshe, OCLC 23644671; republished in The English Works of Roger Ascham, [], London: [] R[obert] and J[ames] Dodsley, [], and J[ohn] Newbery, [], 1761, OCLC 642424485, book 2, page 147:
        The Romaynes, [] appointed alſo the Cenſores to allovv out of the common butche[sic – meaning hutche] yearely ſtipendes, for the findings of certaine geeſe; []
      • 1607, Edward Topsell, “Of the Elephant”, in The Historie of Fovre-footed Beastes. [], London: [] William Iaggard, OCLC 912897215, page 200:
        [T]here vvas no meane prince in all India vvhich vvas not Lord of many Elephants. The king of Palibotræ kept in ſtipend, eight thouſand euery day, []
      • 1766, William Blackstone, “Of Title by Gift, Grant, and Contract”, in Commentaries on the Laws of England, book II (Of the Rights of Things), Oxford, Oxfordshire: [] Clarendon Press, OCLC 65350522, page 454:
        [H]iring is alvvays for a price, a ſtipend, or additional recompenſe; borrovving is merely gratuitous. But the lavv in both caſes is the ſame. They are both contracts, vvhereby the poſſeſſion and a tranſient property is transferred for a particular time or uſe, on condition and agreement to reſtore the goods ſo hired or borrovved, as ſoon as the time is expired or uſe performed; together vvith the price or ſtipend (in caſe of hiring) either expreſſly agreed on by the parties, or left to be implied by lavv according to the value of the ſervice.
      • 1783 June 25, Edmund Burke, “Ninth Report from the Select Committee (of the House of Commons) Appointed to Take into Consideration the State of the Administration of Justice in the Provinces of Bengal, Bahar, and Orissa, []. British Government in India.”, in [Walker King], editor, The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, volume XI, new edition, London: [] [R. Gilbert] for C[harles] and J[ohn] Rivington, [], published 1826, OCLC 1096392342, page 260:
        Mr. [Warren] Hastings, in his letter to Mr. Wheler, urges the necessity of the monthly payment of the Nabob's stipend being regularly made; [] From hence Your Committee conclude, that the monthly payments had not been regularly made; and that whatever distresses the Nabob might have suffered must have been owing to the Governour-General and Council, not to Mahomed Reza Khân; who, for aught that appears to the contrary, paid away the stipend as fast as he received it.
      • 1838 March – 1839 October, Charles Dickens, “Wherein Mr. Ralph Nickleby is Visited by Persons with Whom the Reader has been Already Made Acquainted”, in The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, London: Chapman and Hall, [], published 1839, OCLC 1057107260, page 324:
        Mr. Mantalini waited with much decorum to hear the amount of the proposed stipend, but when it reached his ears, he cast his hat and cane upon the floor, and drawing out his pocket-handkerchief, gave vent to his feelings in a dismal moan.
      • 1848 December 19, Charles Dickens, “The Gift Bestowed”, in The Haunted Man and the Ghost’s Bargain. A Fancy for Christmas-time, London: Bradbury & Evans, [], OCLC 459233875, page 24:
        [W]e took a liking for his very picter that hangs in what used to be, anciently, afore our ten poor gentlemen commuted for an annual stipend in money, our great Dinner Hall.
    2. (education) A scholarship granted to a student. [from 20th c.]
  3. (obsolete)
    1. Money which is earned; an income. [17th c.]
    2. A one-off payment for a service provided. [16th–19th c.]
      • 1549 April 29 (Gregorian calendar), Hugh Latimer, “Sermon XI. Being the Seventh Sermon Preached before King Edward VI. April the Nineteenth.”, in The Sermons of the Right Reverend Father in God, Master Hugh Latimer, Bishop of Worcester. [], volume I, London: [] J. Scott, [], published 1758, OCLC 12219849, page 210:
        ["H]e [Jesus] vvas man, he took upon him our ſins;" Not the vvork of ſin, I mean not ſo, not to do it, not to commit it, but to purge it, to cleanſe it, to bear the ſtipend of it: []
      • 1614, Walter Ralegh [i.e., Walter Raleigh], “The Growth of Rome: And Setling of the Easterne Kingdomes”, in The Historie of the World [], London: [] William Stansby for Walter Burre, [], OCLC 37026674, 4th book, §. I (How the Romans Enlarged Their Dominion in Italie, from the Death of Tullus Hostilius, vnto such Time as They were Assailed by Pyrrhus), page 294:
        This fight vvas ſo vvell performed, that a report vvent currant, of Castor and Pollux, tvvo Gods, vvho came on milke-vvhite Steeds, to be eye vvitneſſes of their valour, and fellovv helpers of their victorie; for the Generall conſecrated a Temple to them, as a ſtipend for their paines.
      • 1620, Fra[ncis] Quarles, “Sect[ion] 6”, in A Feast for Wormes. Set Forth in a Poeme of the History of Ionah, London: [] Felix Kyngston, for Richard Moore, [], OCLC 270804816, signature F3, recto:
        Lo, Death is novv, as alvvayes it hath bin, / The iuſt procured ſtipend of our ſinne: []
        A reference to Romans 6:23 in the Vulgate version of the Bible: “stipendia enim peccati mors [for the wages of sin is death]”.
      • 1620, Fra[ncis] Quarles, “Pentelogia: Or The Quintessence of Meditation. 4. Gloria Cœli.”, in A Feast for Wormes. Set Forth in a Poeme of the History of Ionah, London: [] Felix Kyngston, for Richard Moore, [], OCLC 270804816, signature [O2], recto:
        No Theft, no Cruell Murther harbours there, / No Hoary-headed-Care, ſudden Feare, / No pinching VVant, no (Griping faſt) Oppreſſion, / Nor Death, the ſtipend of our ſoule Tranſgreſſion: []
      • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], “Exercise Rectified of Body and Minde”, in The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970, partition 2, section 2, member 4, page 226:
        Many Gentlemen in like ſort vvith vs, vvill vvade vp to the Armeholes vpon ſuch occaſions [when fishing], and voluntarily vndertake that to ſatisfie their pleaſure, vvhich a poore man for a good ſtipend vvould ſcarce be hired to vndergoe.
      • 1642 April, John Milton, An Apology for Smectymnuus; republished in A Complete Collection of the Historical, Political, and Miscellaneous Works of John Milton, [], volume I, Amsterdam [actually London: s.n.], 1698, OCLC 926209975, page 195:
        Hovv can vve believe ye vvould refuſe to take the ſtipend of Rome, vvhen ye ſhame not to live upon the alms-basket of her prayers?

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

stipend (third-person singular simple present stipends, present participle stipending, simple past and past participle stipended)

  1. (transitive, obsolete or historical) To provide (someone) with a stipend (an allowance, a pension, a salary, etc.). [from 16th c.]
    • 1620, [Miguel de Cervantes]; Thomas Shelton, transl., “How Sancho Demeaned Himselfe in His Gouernment”, in The Second Part of the History of the Valorous and Witty Knight-errant, Don Quixote of the Mancha. [], London: [] [Eliot’s Court Press] for Edward Blount, OCLC 606504853, page 306:
      I, Sir, am a Phyſician, and am ſtipended in this Iland to bee ſo to the Gouernours of it: and I am much more carefull of their health, then of mine ovvn; ſtudying night & day, and vveighing the complexion of the Gouernour, that I may hit the better vpon the curing him, vvhenſoeuer hee falls ſicke: []
    • 1867, Richard Robert Madden, chapter I, in The History of Irish Periodical Literature, from the End of the 17th to the Middle of the 19th Century, [], volume I, London: T[homas] C[autley] Newby, [], OCLC 2095393, page 57:
      The recently discovered "Letters of Daniel Defoe," existing in the Record Office, leave no doubt of the Government practice of suborning and stipending newspaper proprietors and writers connected with them was as old as the times of the "Mercurius Politicus," and other contemporaneous newspapers under Defoe's management and influence.
    • 1869 December 21, W[illiam] Winwood Reade, “[Additional Notices.] Report on a Journey to the Upper Waters of the Niger from Sierra Leone.”, in Proceedings of the Royal Geographical Society, volume XIV, number II, London: [Royal Geographical Society], published 7 June 1870, ISSN 1478-615X, OCLC 806406008, page 187:
      We have a rival in the Melacvurie, but by stipending the King of Falaba, he would use his great power and influence to make the Sangaras take what will doubtless be called the Governor's road, and by stipending the troublesome Limbas, the Sangaras would no longer be subjected to dangers of robbery, and even murder in that country.
    • 1992 March 21, Louise Kleinstiver, witness, “Statement of Louise Kleinstiver, Superintendent, Somerton School District No. 11, Yuma County”, in Hearing on Education Reform and Related Issues: Hearing before the Subcommittee on Elementary, Secondary, and Vocational Education of the Committee on Education and Labor, House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session [] Serial No. 102–106 [], Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, →ISBN, page 19:
      The involvement of parents within their child's education program is critical and there has to be ways of involving parents in that. [] It may mean stipending them because you have taken away their job that day and you have taken away their income that day in order to come into the schools and be part of the educational process.
    • 2002, Colin Jones, “Fleury’s France (1726–43)”, in The Great Nation: France from Louis XV to Napoleon 1715–99, New York, N.Y.: Columbia University Press, →ISBN, page 122:
      As well as enjoying links in the royal court, he [Nicolas Fouquet's grandson] was said to stipend some 200 individuals in the city of Paris to spread favourable news stories about himself.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ stīpend(e, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  2. ^ stipend, n.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2022; “stipend, n.”, in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present, reproduced from Stuart Berg Flexner, editor in chief, Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2nd edition, New York, N.Y.: Random House, 1993, →ISBN.
  3. ^ † stipend, v.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2021.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin stipendium.

Noun[edit]

stipend n (definite singular stipendet, indefinite plural stipend or stipender, definite plural stipenda or stipendene)

  1. a scholarship (grant made to support a student's education)

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Latin stipendium.

Noun[edit]

stipend n (definite singular stipendet, indefinite plural stipend, definite plural stipenda)

  1. a scholarship (grant, as above)

References[edit]