suesco

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Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *swe-dʰh₁-, expanded from the reflexive pronoun Proto-Indo-European *swe- (self) + *dʰeh₁- (to put, place, set), thus the original sense to "set as one's own". Cognate with Ancient Greek ἔθω (éthō), εἴωθα (eíōtha), ἔθνος (éthnos), ἔθος (éthos), ἦθος (êthos), Sanskrit स्वधा (svadhā) and Gothic 𐍃𐌹𐌳𐌿𐍃 (sidus).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

present active suēscō, present infinitive suēscere, perfect active suēvī, supine suētum

  1. (intransitive, rare, poetic) I become used or accustomed to
  2. (transitive, rare, post-classical) I accustom, habituate, train

Usage notes[edit]

This verb is rare and poetic, and prefixed forms such as adsuēsco are more frequent.

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • suesco” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
  • Michiel de Vaan (2008), Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages, Leiden, Boston: Brill Academic Publishers