tofore

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English tofore, toforn, from Old English tōforan (in front of), from (to) + foran (front, fore-part, n.), dative case of fora (front). Compare Dutch tevoren (previously), German zuvor (before, previously). More at to, fore.

Preposition[edit]

tofore

  1. (obsolete) Before.

Adverb[edit]

tofore (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Before.
    • 1592, William Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus:
      Farewell, Lavinia, my noble sister ; O would thou wert as thou tofore hast been!

Conjunction[edit]

tofore

  1. (obsolete) Before.

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English tōforan; equivalent to to- +‎ fore.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /toːˈfɔːr(ə)/, /toːˈfɔːr(ə)n/, /tɔ-/, /tə-/

Adverb[edit]

tofore

  1. In front, ahead; in the first position in a sequence.
  2. At a prior time; beforehand, earlier.
  3. (in texts) Found above; found in a prior section.

Descendants[edit]

  • English: tofore (obsolete)

References[edit]

Preposition[edit]

tofore

  1. In front of.
  2. Closer than something (with reference to the speaker).
  3. In the presence of; before.
  4. Earlier than; prior to.
  5. To a degree greater than; more so than.

References[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

tofore

  1. Indicates that the antecedent clause occurred before the consequent clause in time.
    • (Can we date this quote by Sir Thomas Malory and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Never sith myght he be heled, ne nought shal tofore we come to hym.

Usage notes[edit]

  • As a conjunction, tofore is often paired with þat.

References[edit]