ukase

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Russian ука́з ‎(ukáz, edict, decree), from Old East Slavic указъ ‎(ukáz, edict), from указать ‎(ukazat’, to show, decree), from Old Church Slavonic указати ‎(ukazati, to show, decree), itself formed from the intensifying prefix у- ‎(u-) (denoting a concrete purpose) + казати ‎(kazati, to show, order). Compare Dutch oekaze, German Ukas, etc.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ukase ‎(plural ukases)

  1. An authoritative proclamation; an edict, especially decreed by a Russian czar or (later) emperor.
    • Henry Brougham, Political Philosophy
      Many estates peopled with crown peasants have been, according to an ukase of Peter the Great, ceded to particular individuals on condition of establishing manufactories []
    • 1805, The Times, 6 May 1805, page 3, col. C:
      An Ukase, it appears, has been issued by the Emperor Alexander, to facilitate the introduction of calimancoes and other Norwich goods into his Empire.
    • 1988, James McPherson, Battle Cry of Freedom, Oxford 2004, p. 704:
      The planters, he explained in a letter to Lincoln, would accept emancipation by ukase in preference to being compelled to enact it themselves in a new constitution.
  2. (figuratively) Any absolutist order and/or arrogant proclamation
    • 1965, John Fowles, The Magus:
      I knew a stunned plunge of disappointment and a bitter anger. What right had he to issue such an arbitrary ukase?
    • 2008, Stephen Burt, "Kick Over the Scenery", London Review of Books, July 2008:
      It is a short step from discovering that the world we know is a fake or a cheat to discovering that human beings are themselves factitious: that we are robots, ‘simulacra’ (the title of one of Dick’s novels), ‘just reflex machines’, ‘repeating doomed patterns, a single pattern, over and over’ in accordance with biological or economic ukases.

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French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Russian ука́з ‎(ukáz, edict, decree), from Old East Slavic указъ ‎(ukáz, edict), from указать ‎(ukazat’, to show, decree), from Old Church Slavonic указати ‎(ukazati, to show, decree), itself formed from the intensifying prefix у- ‎(u-) (denoting a concrete purpose) + казати ‎(kazati, to show, order). Compare Dutch oekaze, German Ukas, etc.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ukase m ‎(plural ukases)

  1. An ukase, decree from a Russian absolutist ruler.
  2. (figuratively) Any absolute or arrogant order

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External links[edit]


Italian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ukase m ‎(invariable)

  1. ukase

Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ukase m (plural ukases)

  1. ukase (proclamation by a Russian ruler)