absolutist

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See also: Absolutist

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From absolute +‎ -ist after French absolutiste.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈæb.səˌluː.tɪst/, /ˈæb.səˌljuː.tɪst/
    • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈæb.səˌlu.tɪst/

Noun[edit]

absolutist (plural absolutists)

  1. One who is in favor of an absolute or autocratic government. [from mid 19th c.][1]
  2. (metaphysics) One who believes that it is possible to realize a cognition or concept of the Absolute. [from mid 19th c.][1]
    • 1859–1860, William Hamilton, edited by H[enry] L[ongueville] Mansel and John Veitch, Lectures on Metaphysics and Logic [], volumes (please specify |volume=I to IV), Edinburgh, London: William Blackwood and Sons, →OCLC:
      the unitarian — whether materialist, idealist, or absolutist
    • 1909, William James, The Meaning of Truth[1]:
      When absolutists reject humanism because they feel it to be untrue, that means that the whole habit of their mental needs is wedded already to a different view of reality, in comparison with which the humanistic world seems but the whim of a few irresponsible youths.
  3. An uncompromising person; one who maintains certain principles to be absolute. [from early 20th c.][1]
    • 2022 December 16, Bernhard Warner, “Musk Faces Growing Anger Over Twitter Ban of Journalists”, in The New York Times[2], →ISSN:
      The billionaire tech mogul, who has described himself as a free speech absolutist, introduced a new red line this week after he claimed that a car carrying one of his children was accosted by a “crazy stalker.”

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

absolutist (comparative more absolutist, superlative most absolutist)

  1. Of or pertaining to absolutism; arbitrary; despotic; uncompromising. [from mid 19th c.][1]
    • 1911, H. W. Carless Davis, Medieval Europe[3]:
      The best and the worst features of the communal regime are illustrated in the resistance of the Lombard cities to Frederic Barbarossa, the first Emperor who formulated and applied to Italy a scheme of absolutist government.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Lesley Brown, editor-in-chief; William R. Trumble and Angus Stevenson, editors (2002), “absolutist”, in The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary on Historical Principles, 5th edition, Oxford; New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 9.

Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

absolutist c (singular definite absolutisten, plural indefinite absolutister)

  1. absolutist

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Likely borrowed from Spanish absolutista, because the word was initially used for Spanish absolutists during the Ominous Decade. Equivalent to absoluut +‎ -ist.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌɑp.soː.lyˈtɪst/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ab‧so‧lu‧tist
  • Rhymes: -ɪst

Noun[edit]

absolutist m (plural absolutisten)

  1. (politics, historical, political science) absolutist (adherent of the absolute sovereignty of rulers) [from 1820s]
  2. (philosophy) absolutist (one believing in metaphysical absolutes)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

absolutt +‎ -ist, first part from Latin absolūtus (concluded, absolute), perfect passive participle of absolvō (complete, finish), from both ab- (from, off, away from), from Latin ab (from, away from, on, in), from Proto-Italic *ab, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂epó (off, away) + and from solvō (release, loosen, dissolve, take apart), from both sē- (apart-, aside-, away), from Proto-Indo-European *s(w)ēd, the ablative singular of *s(w)é (self) + and from luō (I untie, set free, separate), from Proto-Indo-European *lewh₃- (to wash). Last part from French -iste (-ist, -istic), from Latin -ista (-ist; one who practises or believes), from Ancient Greek -ιστής (-istḗs), alternative form of -τής (-tḗs), from Proto-Hellenic *-tās, probably from Proto-Indo-European *-teh₂ (forms nouns representing state of being).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /absʊlʉˈtɪst/, /apsʊlʉˈtɪst/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪst
  • Hyphenation: ab‧so‧lut‧ist

Noun[edit]

absolutist m (definite singular absolutisten, indefinite plural absolutister, definite plural absolutistene)

  1. (politics, political science) an absolutist (one who is in favor of an absolute or autocratic government)
    • 1853, Henrik Wergeland, Samlede Skrifter III, page 43:
      absolutisternes rædselsgjerninger og forfølgelser mod de liberale [i Spania]
      the atrocities of the absolutists and the persecution of the liberals [in Spain]
    • 2004 July 9, Morgenbladet:
      konferansen blir avbrutt av … primitivistiske studenter og religiøse absolutister
      the conference is interrupted by… primitivist students and religious absolutists

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French absolutiste.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

absolutist m or n (feminine singular absolutistă, masculine plural absolutiști, feminine and neuter plural absolutiste)

  1. absolutist (pertaining to absolutism)

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

absolutist m (plural absolutiști, feminine equivalent absolutistă)

  1. absolutist (proponent of absolutism)

Declension[edit]

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

absolut +‎ -ist, since 1825. In the sense of abstinence since 1842.

Noun[edit]

absolutist c

  1. a teetotaller; a person who completely abstains from alcohol (often out of principle)
    Synonym: helnykterist
  2. an absolutist; a supporter of absolutism, despotism, dictatorship

Declension[edit]

Declension of absolutist 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative absolutist absolutisten absolutister absolutisterna
Genitive absolutists absolutistens absolutisters absolutisternas

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]