diktat

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See also: Diktat

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Diktat, from Latin dictātum, supine of dictō (dictate)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

diktat (plural diktats)

  1. a harsh penalty or settlement imposed upon a defeated party by the victor
  2. a dogmatic decree, especially issued by one who rules without popular consent
    • 1982: The Planners and the Peasants by Steven L. Sampson
      Today, regional diktat is now supplemented (though not wholly replaced) by other means of recruiting elites.
    • 2005, Vitaly Naumkin, Radical Islam in Central Asia: Between Pen and Rifle, page 179
      It should be noted that Saddam's power was held up by fear and diktat.
    • 2018: "Brand Loyalty" by Julian Sanchez, Just Security
      Trump—according not to the paranoid fears of his opponents, but his own professed desires—would have the government’s law enforcement institutions act as political weapons, aimed by his diktat.

See also[edit]


French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

diktat m (plural diktats)

  1. diktat

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Noun[edit]

dìktāt m (Cyrillic spelling дѝкта̄т)

  1. dictate

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

diktat m (plural diktats)

  1. diktat