welter

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowing from Middle Low German [Term?], from Proto-Germanic [Term?]. Cognates include Old Norse velta (Danish vælte), German wälzen, Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐌻𐍄𐌾𐌰𐌽 ‎(waltjan). Akin to wallow, Gothic *𐍅𐌰𐌻𐍅𐌾𐌰𐌽 ‎(*walwjan) and Latin volvō.

Noun[edit]

welter ‎(plural welters)

  1. General confusion; disorderly mixture; aimless effort.
    a welter of papers and magazines

Verb[edit]

welter ‎(third-person singular simple present welters, present participle weltering, simple past and past participle weltered)

  1. (intransitive) To roll; to wallow.
  2. (intransitive, sometimes figuratively) To be soaked or steeped in.
    • Latimer
      When we welter in pleasures and idleness, then we eat and drink with drunkards.
    • Spenser
      These wizards welter in wealth's waves.
    • Landor
      the priests at the altar [] weltering in their blood
  3. To rise and fall, as waves; to tumble over, as billows.
    • Milton
      the weltering waves
    • Wordsworth
      waves that, hardly weltering, die away
    • Trench
      through this blindly weltering sea
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions.

Adjective[edit]

welter

  1. Heavyweight (of horsemen).
    a welter race
Translations[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Compare wilt (intransitive verb).

Verb[edit]

welter ‎(third-person singular simple present welters, present participle weltering, simple past and past participle weltered)

  1. To wither; to wilt.
    • I. Taylor
      Weltered hearts and blighted [] memories.

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English welter.

Noun[edit]

welter m ‎(invariable)

  1. welter-weight

Synonyms[edit]