welter

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See also: wélter

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowing from Middle Low German [Term?], from Proto-Germanic [Term?]. Cognates include Old Norse velta (Danish vælte), German wälzen, Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐌻𐍄𐌾𐌰𐌽 ‎(waltjan). Akin to wallow, Gothic *𐍅𐌰𐌻𐍅𐌾𐌰𐌽 ‎(*walwjan) and Latin volvō.

Noun[edit]

welter ‎(plural welters)

  1. A general confusion or muddle
    a welter of papers and magazines

Verb[edit]

welter ‎(third-person singular simple present welters, present participle weltering, simple past and past participle weltered)

  1. (intransitive) To roll around; to wallow.
  2. (intransitive, sometimes figuratively) To be soaked or covered in.
    • Latimer
      When we welter in pleasures and idleness, then we eat and drink with drunkards.
    • Spenser
      These wizards welter in wealth's waves.
    • Landor
      the priests at the altar [] weltering in their blood
  3. (of waves) To rise and fall,
  4. to tumble over (said of billows).
    • Milton
      the weltering waves
    • Wordsworth
      waves that, hardly weltering, die away
    • Trench
      through this blindly weltering sea
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology Scriptorium.

Adjective[edit]

welter

  1. Heavyweight (of horsemen).
    a welter race
Translations[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Compare wilt (intransitive verb).

Verb[edit]

welter ‎(third-person singular simple present welters, present participle weltering, simple past and past participle weltered)

  1. To wither; to wilt.
    • I. Taylor
      Weltered hearts and blighted [] memories.

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English welter.

Noun[edit]

welter m ‎(invariable)

  1. welter-weight

Synonyms[edit]