dent

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English[edit]

A dented shield.

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Middle English dent, dente, dint (blow, strike, dent), from Old English dynt (blow, strike, the mark or noise of a blow), from Proto-Germanic *duntiz (a blow). Akin to Old Norse dyntr (dint). More at dint.

Noun[edit]

dent (plural dents)

  1. A shallow deformation in the surface of an object, produced by an impact.
    The crash produced a dent in the left side of the car.
  2. (by extension, informal) A sudden negative change, such as loss, damage, weakening, consumption or diminution, especially one produced by an external force, event or action
    That purchase put a bit of a dent in my wallet.
    • 2011 April 11, Phil McNulty, “Liverpool 3 - 0 Man City”, BBC Sport:
      Andy Carroll's first goals since his £35m move to Liverpool put a dent in Manchester City's Champions League hopes as they were emphatically swept aside at Anfield.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

dent (third-person singular simple present dents, present participle denting, simple past and past participle dented)

  1. (transitive) To impact something, producing a dent.
  2. (intransitive) To develop a dent or dents.
    Copper is soft and dents easily.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

French, from Latin dens, dentis, tooth. See tooth.

Noun[edit]

dent (plural dents)

  1. (engineering) A tooth, as of a card, a gear wheel, etc.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dentem, accusative of dēns.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dent f (plural dents)

  1. (anatomy) tooth
  2. tooth (saw tooth)
  3. tooth (gear tooth)

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French dent, from Latin dentem, accusative of dēns, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₃dénts, *h₃dónts.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dent f (plural dents)

  1. tooth
  2. cog (tooth on a gear)

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Jèrriais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French dent, from Latin dēns, dentem, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃dénts, *h₃dónts.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dent m (plural dents)

  1. (anatomy) tooth

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

dent

  1. third-person plural present active subjunctive of

Middle French[edit]

Noun[edit]

dent f (plural dens)

  1. tooth

Descendants[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin *dente, Classical Latin dens.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dent m (oblique plural denz or dentz, nominative singular denz or dentz, nominative plural dent)

  1. tooth (anatomy)
  2. tooth (of a comb)

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Puter, Vallader) daint

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dēns, dentem, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃dénts, *h₃dónts.

Noun[edit]

dent m (plural dents)

  1. (anatomy, Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) tooth

Derived terms[edit]