tend

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English tenden, from Old English tendan (to kindle, set on fire) (usually in compounds ātendan, fortendan, ontendan), from Proto-Germanic *tandijaną (to kindle), of unknown origin. Cognate with Danish tænde (to kindle), Swedish tända (to kindle), Gothic [script needed] (tandjan, to kindle), Icelandic tendra (to ignite), German zünden (to light, ignite, fire). Related to tinder.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

tend (third-person singular simple present tends, present participle tending, simple past and past participle tended)

  1. (transitive, now chiefly dialectal) To kindle; ignite; set on fire; light; inflame; burn.
Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English *tenden, from Old French tendre (to stretch, stretch out, hold forth, offer, tender), from Latin tendere (to strech, stretch out, extend, spread out).

Verb[edit]

tend (third-person singular simple present tends, present participle tending, simple past and past participle tended)

  1. (law, Old English law) To make a tender of; to offer or tender.
  2. (followed by a to infinitive) To be likely, or probable to do something, or to have a certain characteristic. [from the mid-14th c.]
    They tend to go out on Saturdays.
    It tends to snow here in winter.
Usage notes[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

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Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English tenden, by apheresis of attenden (to attend). More at attend.

Verb[edit]

tend (third-person singular simple present tends, present participle tending, simple past and past participle tended)

  1. (with to) To look after (e.g. an ill person.) [from the early 14th c.]
    We need to tend to the garden, which has become a mess.
  2. To accompany as an assistant or protector; to care for the wants of; to look after; to watch; to guard.
    Shepherds tend their flocks.
    • Emerson
      There's not a sparrow or a wren, / There's not a blade of autumn grain, / Which the four seasons do not tend / And tides of life and increase lend.
  3. To wait (upon), as attendants or servants; to serve; to attend.
    • Shakespeare
      Was he not companion with the riotous knights / That tend upon my father?
  4. (obsolete) To await; to expect.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  5. (obsolete) To be attentive to; to note carefully; to attend to.
    • Chapman
      Being to descend / A ladder much in height, I did not tend / My way well down.
  6. (transitive, nautical) To manage (an anchored vessel) when the tide turns, to prevent it from entangling the cable when swinging.
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Albanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *tend-, from Proto-Indo-European *ten-d- 'to distend; draw, strech (out)'. Cognate to Latin tendo (to strech (out), strain). Present dendë with assimilation of the anlaut[1].

Verb[edit]

tend (first-person singular past tense denda, participle dendë)

  1. to stuff, cram, to compress
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Albanische Etymologien (Untersuchungen zum albanischen Erbwortschatz), Bardhyl Demiraj, Leiden Studies in Indo-European 7; Amsterdam - Atlanta 1997, p.129

French[edit]

Verb[edit]

tend

  1. third-person singular present indicative of tendre

Anagrams[edit]