flirt

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See also: Flirt

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

1553, from the merger of Early Modern English flirt (to flick), flurt (to mock, jibe, scorn), and flirt, flurt (a giddy girl). Of obscure origin and relation. Apparently related to similar words in Germanic, compare Eastern Frisian flirt (a flick of the fingers, a light blow), Eastern Frisian flirtje (a giddy girl), Low German flirtje (a flirt), German Flirtchen (a flirt), Norwegian flira (to giggle, titter). Perhaps from Middle English gill-flurt (a flirt), or an alteration of flird (a trifling", also, "to jibe, jeer at), from Middle English flerd (mockery, fraud, deception), from Old English fleard (nonsense, vanity, folly, deception). Compare Scots flird (to talk idly, flirt, flaunt). See flird.

Noun[edit]

flirt (plural flirts)

  1. A sudden jerk; a quick throw or cast; a darting motion; hence, a jeer.
    • Addison
      Several little flirts and vibrations.
    • Edgar Allan Poe
      With many a flirt and flutter.
  2. One who flirts; especially a woman who acts with giddiness, or plays at courtship; a coquette; a pert girl.
    • Addison
      Several young flirts about town had a design to cast us out of the fashionable world.
  3. An episode of flirting.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

flirt (third-person singular simple present flirts, present participle flirting, simple past and past participle flirted)

  1. (transitive) To throw (something) with a jerk or sudden movement; to fling. [from 16th c.]
    They flirt water in each other's faces.
    to flirt a glove, or a handkerchief
  2. (intransitive) To jeer at; to mock. [16th-18th c.]
    • Beaumont and Fletcher
      I am ashamed; I am scorned; I am flirted.
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.27:
      Asinius Pollio [] , having written many invectives against Plancus, staid untill he were dead to publish them. It was rather to flurt at a blind man, and raile in a dead mans eare, and to offend a senselesse man, than incurre the danger of his revenge.
  3. (intransitive) To dart about; to move with quick, jerky motions. [from 16th c.]
  4. (transitive) To blurt out. [from 17th c.]
    • 1915, Thornton W. Burgess, The Adventures of Chatterer the Red Squirrel, Little, Brown, and Company, Boston, Ch. XXI:
      Chatterer flirted his tale in the saucy way he has, and his eyes twinkled.
  5. (intransitive) To play at courtship; to talk with teasing affection, to insinuate sexual attraction in a playful (especially conversational) way. [from 18th c.]
    • 2006, The Guardian, 21 Apr 2006:
      Dr Hutchinson, who told jurors that he had been married for 37 years and that his son was a policeman, said he enjoyed flirting with the woman, was flattered by her attention and was anticipating patting her bottom again - but had no intention of seducing her.

Antonyms[edit]

  • ("to insinuate emotional affection"): belittle

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Adjective[edit]

flirt (not comparable)

  1. pert; wanton

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

flirt

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of flirten
  2. imperative of flirten

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English flirt.

Noun[edit]

flirt m (plural flirts)

  1. An episode of (or the act of) flirting.

Related terms[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English flirt.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flirt m

  1. flirting

Declension[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English flirt.

Noun[edit]

flirt m (plural flirts)

  1. An episode of (or the act of) flirting.

Related terms[edit]