numen

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nūmen.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

numen (plural numina)

  1. a divinity, especially a local or presiding god
    • 1965, Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49:
      Where were Secretaries James and Foster and Senator Joseph, those dear daft numina who’d mothered over Oedipa’s so temperate youth?
    • 1985, Anthony Burgess, Kingdom of the Wicked:
      It was the solid and immovable tabernacle of the living numen whose son he had known, though but briefly and not intimately, in the flesh, and whose message he accepted with all his heart.

See also[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Of Proto-Indo-European origin. Cognate with Ancient Greek νεύω (neúō, nod, beckon).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nūmen n (genitive nūminis); third declension

  1. a nod of the head
  2. divine sway or will
  3. divine power or right
  4. divinity

Inflection[edit]

Third declension neuter.

Number Singular Plural
nominative nūmen nūmina
genitive nūminis nūminum
dative nūminī nūminibus
accusative nūmen nūmina
ablative nūmine nūminibus
vocative nūmen nūmina

References[edit]

  • Michiel de Vaan (2008), Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages, Leiden, Boston: Brill Academic Publishers, page 419

Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

numen

  1. past participle of niman

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin numen.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

numen m (plural numina)

  1. numen
  2. muse (source of inspiration)

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

"numen" in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima segunda edición (Dictionary of the Spanish Language, Twenty-Second Edition), Real Academia Española (Royal Spanish Academy), 2001.