rub

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English rubben. Cognate with Saterland Frisian rubje (to rub, scrape), Low German rubblig (rough, uneven), Icelandic and Norwegian rubba (to scrape), Danish rubbe (to rub, scrub).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rub (plural rubs)

  1. An act of rubbing.
    Give that lamp a good rub and see if any genies come out
  2. A difficulty or problem.
    Therein lies the rub.
    • 1594, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark III.i.71-75
      To die, to sleep—/To sleep—perchance to dream. Ay, there's the rub!/For in that sleep of death what dreams may come,/When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,/Must give us pause
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses, Episode 16
      ...the propriety of the cabman's shelter, as it was called, hardly a stonesthrow away near Butt bridge where they might hit upon some drinkables in the shape of a milk and soda or a mineral. But how to get there was the rub.
  3. In the game of crown green bowls: any obstacle by which a bowl is diverted from its normal course.
  4. A mixture of spices applied to meat before it is barbecued.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

rub (third-person singular simple present rubs, present participle rubbing, simple past and past participle rubbed)

  1. (transitive) To move (one object) while maintaining contact with another object over some area, with pressure and friction.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 7, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      “[…] This is Mr. Churchill, who, as you are aware, is good enough to come to us for his diaconate, and, as we hope, for much longer; and being a gentleman of independent means, he declines to take any payment.” Saying this Walden rubbed his hands together and smiled contentedly.
    I rubbed the cloth over the glass.
    The cat rubbed itself against my leg.
    I rubbed my hands together for warmth.
  2. (transitive) To rub something against (a second thing).
    I rubbed the glass with the cloth.
    • Sir T. Elyot
      It shall be expedient, after that body is cleaned, to rub the body with a coarse linen cloth.
  3. (intransitive) To be rubbed against something.
    My shoes are beginning to rub.
  4. (transitive) To spread a substance thinly over; to smear.
    meat rubbed with spices before barbecuing
    • Milton
      The smoothed plank, [] / New rubbed with balm.
  5. (dated) To move or pass with difficulty.
    to rub through woods, as huntsmen
  6. To scour; to burnish; to polish; to brighten; to cleanse; often with up or over.
    to rub up silver
    • South
      The whole business of our redemption is to rub over the defaced copy of the creation.
  7. To hinder; to cross; to thwart.
    • Shakespeare
      'Tis the duke's pleasure, / Whose disposition, all the world well knows, / Will not be rubbed nor stopped.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Rub of a credit card

Etymology[edit]

Common Slavic, from Proto-Slavic *rǫbъ (something which was cut), from *rǫbati (to cut, chop).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rub m

  1. back (the reverse side)
    rub karty -- back of the card
    rub mince -- reverse of the coin
  2. the other (often negative) aspect of a situation

Declension[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ rub in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, Leda, 2007

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

rub

  1. rafsi of ruble.

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

rub

  1. second-person singular imperative of rubaś

Manx[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English rub.

Noun[edit]

rub m (genitive rub, plural rubbyn)

  1. rub

Verb[edit]

rub (verbal noun rubbey or rubbal)

  1. to rub

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *rǫbъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rȗb m (Cyrillic spelling ру̑б)

  1. rim
  2. edge, brink

Declension[edit]