kink

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English kinken, kynken, from Old English *cincian ("to laugh"; attested by cincung (a fit of laughter)), from Proto-Germanic *kinkōną (to laugh), from Proto-Indo-European *gang- (to mock, jeer, deride), related to Old English canc (jeering, scorn, derision). Cognate with Dutch kinken (to kink, cough).

Verb[edit]

kink (third-person singular simple present kinks, present participle kinking, simple past and past participle kinked)

  1. To laugh loudly.
  2. To gasp for breath as in a severe fit of coughing.

Noun[edit]

kink (plural kinks)

  1. A convulsive fit of coughing or laughter; a sonorous indraft of breath; a whoop; a gasp of breath caused by laughing, coughing, or crying.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Norwegian or Swedish kink (a twist or curl in a rope), from Middle Low German kinke (spiral screw, coil), from Proto-Germanic *kenk-, *keng- (to bend, turn), from Proto-Indo-European *gengʰ- (to turn, wind, braid, weave). Cognate with Icelandic kengur (a bend or bight; a metal crook).

Noun[edit]

kink (plural kinks)

  1. A tight curl, twist, or bend in a length of thin material, hair etc.
    We couldn't get enough water to put out the fire because of a kink in the hose.
  2. A difficulty or flaw that is likely to impede operation, as in a plan or system.
    They had planned to open another shop downtown, but their plan had a few kinks.
  3. An unreasonable notion; a crotchet; a whim; a caprice.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Cozzens to this entry?)
  4. (slang, countable and uncountable) Peculiarity or deviation in sexual behaviour or taste.
    • 2013, Alison Tyler, H Is for Hardcore (page 13)
      To top it all off, Lynn is into kink. Last night she was really into kink. It's a good thing that today is my day off because I need the time to recuperate and think things over.
  5. (Scotland, dialect) A fit of coughing or laughter.
  6. (mathematics) A positive 1-soliton solution to the Sine–Gordon equation
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

kink (third-person singular simple present kinks, present participle kinking, simple past and past participle kinked)

  1. (transitive) To form a kink or twist.
  2. (intransitive) To be formed into a kink or twist.
Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]