Alfred

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See also: Alfréd

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English Ælfrǣd, from ælf (elf) and rǣd (counsel).

Proper noun[edit]

Alfred

  1. (individuals) Alfred the Great, early king of England.
  2. A male given name from Old English.
    • 1980, Graham Greene, Doctor Fisher of Geneva, or the Bomb Party (fiction), OCLC 6273193:
      Unfortunately for me my father had combined diplomacy with a study of Anglo-Saxon history and, of course with my mother's consent, he gave me the name of Alfred, one of his heroes ( I believe she had boggled at Aelfred ). This Christian name, for some inexplicable reason, had become corrupted in the eyes of our middle-class world; it belonged exclusively now to the working class and was usually abbreviated to Alf. Perhaps that was why Doctor Fisher, the inventor of Dentophil Bouquet, never called me anything but Jones, even after I married his daughter.
    • 1998, Steven Herrick, A Place Like This (fiction), University of Queensland Press, →ISBN, page 86:
      You give a kid a name like Cameron / or Alfred, or something like that, / and they end up wearing glasses / and looking at computers for the rest of their life.
  3. (rare) A patronymic surname​.
  4. A town, the county seat of York County, Maine, United States.

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Azerbaijani[edit]

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Proper noun[edit]

Alfred

  1. A male given name, equivalent to English Alfred

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English Alfred, from Old English Ælfræd.

Proper noun[edit]

Alfred

  1. A male given name.

References[edit]

  • [1] Danskernes Navne, based on CPR data: 21 194 males with the given name Alfred have been registered in Denmark between about 1890 (=the population alive in 1967) and January 2005, with the frequency peak in the 1900s decade. Accessed on 19 June 2011.

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English Alfred.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɑl.frɛt/
  • Hyphenation: Al‧fred

Proper noun[edit]

Alfred m

  1. A male given name.

Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately, from Old English Ælfræd.

Proper noun[edit]

Alfred m

  1. A male given name.

Usage notes[edit]

Patronymics:

  • son of Alfred: Alfredsson
  • daughter of Alfred: Alfredsdóttir

Declension[edit]

Singular
Indefinite
Nominative Alfred
Accusative Alfred
Dative Alfredi
Genitive Alfreds

Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English Alfred, from Old English Ælfræd, possibly through Swedish Alfred.

Proper noun[edit]

Alfred

  1. A male given name.
  2. Alfred Nussi

Declension[edit]

Inflection of Alfred (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative Alfred Alfredit
genitive Alfredin Alfredien
partitive Alfredia Alfredeja
illative Alfrediin Alfredeihin
singular plural
nominative Alfred Alfredit
accusative nom. Alfred Alfredit
gen. Alfredin
genitive Alfredin Alfredien
partitive Alfredia Alfredeja
inessive Alfredissa Alfredeissa
elative Alfredista Alfredeista
illative Alfrediin Alfredeihin
adessive Alfredilla Alfredeilla
ablative Alfredilta Alfredeilta
allative Alfredille Alfredeille
essive Alfredina Alfredeina
translative Alfrediksi Alfredeiksi
instructive Alfredein
abessive Alfreditta Alfredeitta
comitative Alfredeineen
Possessive forms of Alfred (type risti)
possessor singular plural
1st person Alfredini Alfredimme
2nd person Alfredisi Alfredinne
3rd person Alfredinsa

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English Alfred, from Old English Ælfræd.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Alfred m

  1. A male given name.
    • 1862, Victor Hugo, Les Misérables, volume 1, Book 4:1 (fiction):
      Il n’est pas rare aujourd’hui que le garçon bouvier se nomme Arthur, Alfred ou Alphonse, et que le vicomte — s’il y a encore des vicomtes — se nomme Thomas, Pierre ou Jacques. Ce déplacement qui met le nom « élégant » sur le plébéien et le nom campagnard sur l’aristocrate n’est autre chose qu’un remous d’égalité. L’irrésistible pénétration du souffle nouveau est là comme en tout.
      It is not rare for the neatherd's boy nowadays to bear the name of Arthur, Alfred, or Alphonse, and for the vicomte--if there are still any vicomtes--to be called Thomas, Pierre, or Jacques. This displacement, which places the "elegant" name on the plebeian and the rustic name on the aristocrat, is nothing else than an eddy of equality. The irresistible penetration of the new inspiration is there as everywhere else.
      (1887 translation by Isabel F. Hapgood)

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English Alfred, from Old English Ælfræd.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈalfʁeːt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: Al‧f‧red

Proper noun[edit]

Alfred

  1. A male given name, fashionable in the 19th century.

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately, from Old English Ælfræd.

Proper noun[edit]

Alfred m

  1. A male given name, equivalent to English Alfred.

Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English Alfred, from Old English Ælfræd.

Proper noun[edit]

Alfred

  1. A male given name.

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English Alfred, from Old English Ælfræd. First recorded as a Swedish given name in 1751.

Proper noun[edit]

Alfred c (genitive Alfreds)

  1. A male given name, fashionable in the 19th century.