Chin

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See also: chin, chín, chỉn, and -chin

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Chin

  1. A hamlet in Alberta, Canada.

Etymology 2[edit]

As a Chinese surname, a variant romanization of various Chinese characters, typically in local dialects. As a name for China, see China.

Proper noun[edit]

Chin

  1. (obsolete) Alternative form of China.
  2. Alternative form of Jin (Chinese dynasty)
    • 1929, Witter Bynner, transl., The Jade Mountain[1], Alfred A. Knopf, published 1967, OCLC 904268756, page xxxvi:
      The most amazing poems in human history are the Huêi-wên-tʻü or the revolving chart, by Lady Su Huêi, of the Chin Dynasty (265-419), and the Chʻien-tzŭ-wên, or thousand-character literature, by Chou Hsing-ssŭ, (fifth century a.d.)
    • 1964, Lai Ming, A History of Chinese Literature[2], New York: John Day Company, LCCN 64-20468, OCLC 1496655, page 3:
      The second significant feature in the development of Chinese literature is the immense influence of Buddhist literature on the development of every sphere of Chinese literature since the East Chin Period (A.D. 317).
    • 1979, Smith, Bradley; Wan-go Weng, China: A History in Art[3], Doubleday & Co., →ISBN, LCCN 72-76978, OCLC 930828788, OL 7437317M, pages 100-101:
      Wang Tao, the head of a great northern family, emigrated to the south and there became the chief architect of the Eastern Chin dynasty, a regime noted for excellent calligraphy.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Burmese ချင်း (hkyang:).

Proper noun[edit]

Chin

  1. A tribe in Burma.
  2. A state of Burma
  3. Synonym of Zo: a language of Burma.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Hakka (chén).

Proper noun[edit]

Chin

  1. A surname, from Hakka​.

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

Chin

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ちん