Talk:note

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Format[edit]

This article needs lots of formatting TLC. — Hippietrail 12:23, 30 Jul 2004 (UTC)

Although this distinction is often blurred in careless speech, in music, note refers to duration of a sound in contrast to tone that refers to its pitch. nl:Gebruiker:Jcwf

"on that note"[edit]

"On that note, I bid you adieu." Do we define this sense at the moment? ---> Tooironic 14:38, 20 July 2010 (UTC)

I think it's Ety 2, noun sense 13 "observation", but I'm not 100% sure. Thryduulf (talk) 15:14, 20 July 2010 (UTC)
I have always thought of it as some kind of figurative use of a musical sense. It is clearer in a usage like: "He ended his speech on a sour note." Is that really worth lexical treatment? DCDuring TALK 15:37, 20 July 2010 (UTC)
Yes. We don't currently have a def for it, but it should be something like "a sound conveying a particular mood, emotion etc; especially, figuratively, a given emotional tone or context". As well as "on that note" you get constructions like, "on a happier note..." as DCD has said. Ƿidsiþ 15:42, 20 July 2010 (UTC)

RFV 1[edit]

Discussed here. — Beobach 06:13, 21 November 2010 (UTC)

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Rfv-sense x 2: noun:

  1. Use.
  2. Business, need.
Has this been in use after 1500? It might belong under an Middle English L2 heading. OED might help. DCDuring TALK 14:39, 21 May 2009 (UTC)
RFV-failed after a year, senses removed without prejudice. — Beobach972 05:10, 14 November 2010 (UTC)


etymology 1[edit]

I'd make an educated guess that everything in etymology 1 is incorrect/archaic/obsolete/vandalism. --Dilated pupils 11:44, 8 July 2011 (UTC)

  • They were added by User:Leasnam here, claiming to be from Century dictionary - this should be referenced, but I've rfv'd all the senses anyway. --Dilated pupils 11:52, 8 July 2011 (UTC)
Some of the senses were subject to the RFV in the section above. - -sche (discuss) 02:52, 15 August 2011 (UTC)

RFV 2[edit]

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Rfv-senses for all of Etymology 1 section.

  1. Utility, profit, advantage.
  2. Affair, matter, concern.
  3. An event, occasion.
  4. Business, usually needful in nature; Expedition, undertaking, enterprise.
  5. Conflict; Fray.

These may be vandalism. Webster 1913 has "Note, n. [AS. notu use, profit.] Need; needful business. [Obs.] Chaucer. " --Dilated pupils 11:47, 8 July 2011 (UTC)

Not vandalism. These senses have been verified once before. All are listed in Century Dictionary 1906/1911. Leasnam 20:33, 11 July 2011 (UTC)
I don't see any evidence that these senses have been verified. There are no citations. The Century Dictionary is a good source, but we don't accept authority without citation, even the OED. OTOH, we don't challenge such definitions wholesale. Perhaps the senses wouldn't have been challenged had there been a references section with a link to the online Century Dictionary. DCDuring TALK 20:44, 11 July 2011 (UTC)
I should say they were questioned once before. Okay, I can see about adding some cites and a ref. Century is good at providing such, as finding them otherwise will be difficult due to interference from Etymology_2. Leasnam 21:08, 11 July 2011 (UTC)
Could some or all of these senses by limited to Middle English? In practice, we usually are not as demanding for those. DCDuring TALK 21:16, 11 July 2011 (UTC)
I will need to see and evaluate them one by one. I doubt that they are ME, as I am pretty confident that this word survived into the EME period. I am not able at the moment to look them up, but I will once I return home. Leasnam 21:24, 11 July 2011 (UTC)
The talk page links to the old discussion (here); it seems two senses (specifically "use" and "need") were doubted in May of 2009 and rfv-failed in November 2010 as uncited. (Can anyone think of collocations? I'll try "have note of" for "have need of", and "was of note" for "was of advantage" or "was of concern", but I realise that is also a collocation of the "reputation" sense.) By the way, if the senses survived into Modern English, they were also used in the Middle English period, right? Should we also have a Middle English section, or is it our tendency to for(e)go Middle English sections for words that have Modern English sections? - -sche (discuss) 02:51, 15 August 2011 (UTC)
I have tagged the verb senses:
  1. To use; make use of; employ.
  2. To enjoy.
  3. To use for food; eat.
  4. To need; have occasion for.
So far, I have only found a Middle English use of the verb. I continue looking. - -sche (discuss) 03:52, 15 August 2011 (UTC)
We usually omit Middle English if there is Modern English, not by my preference. I expect that there are exceptions if there are senses that are dead or other radical differences. Having access to the OED helps. I just found out that the Middle English Dictionary is available online. It looks amazingly comprehensive. DCDuring TALK 09:40, 15 August 2011 (UTC)
A good source for fairly recent cites (year 1800+) may be obtained from the [dialect dictionary]. Leasnam 09:59, 15 August 2011 (UTC)
Sense 5 contains the verb senses; and all appear to be primarily Scottish. Leasnam 10:06, 15 August 2011 (UTC)
Excellent! Resources like that have helped us cite several dated terms before. This copy of Douglas' work has a glossary suggesting "note" also once meant "move" (let's not add that sense unless we can find it in literature), and it uses the word in several senses in the text; however, it also suggests that Douglas wrote in Scots, not English (and that the work was first published in 1553, but that's still in the Modern English era, so not a problem). I am looking through Spenser. - -sche (discuss) 17:47, 15 August 2011 (UTC)
Uncited senses RFV-failed. - -sche (discuss) 02:22, 1 March 2012 (UTC)


Aroma note, spice note, taste note[edit]

There appears to exist another meaning of note which is used e.g. on w:Aroma of wine or w:Note (perfumery). /195.249.119.154 13:55, 14 January 2014 (UTC)

That seems like it's an extension of the music sense applied to scents. You can go ahead and add it. --WikiTiki89 15:52, 14 January 2014 (UTC)

Senses deleted per the two RFVs[edit]

These senses failed RFV *twice* and were readded without sufficient citations after each RFV-failure. Do not re-add them without sufficient citations.

- -sche (discuss) 01:11, 5 August 2015 (UTC)

RFV discussion: August 2015–February 2016[edit]

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Rfv-sense of two senses:

  1. "Contraction of ne mote ‎(“may not”)."
  2. "To butt; to push with the horns."

The English Dialect Dictionary, which sometimes has helpful pointers to uses, only has one citation (useless to us) of another dictionary for "push or gore with the horns". Btw, I also just removed some senses which failed RFV twice and yet were re-added twice without sufficient citations. - -sche (discuss) 01:21, 5 August 2015 (UTC)

I found one usable citation for the meaning to butt or push with the horns: [[1]]. —This comment was unsigned.

Strangely, when I look at the actual snippet that Google Books is OCR-ing as "27 1   trampled and noted by a bull", what the book actually says is "27 1  trampled and gored by a bull". - -sche (discuss) 09:36, 4 February 2016 (UTC)
The "may not" sense had only this citation:
  • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.3:
    There Merlin stayd, / As overcomen of the spirites powre, / Or other ghastly spectacle dismayd, / That secretly he saw, yet note discoure [...].

The "gore" sense had this etymology, and the alt form knoit:

Perhaps related to dialectal noit, knoit (nob; projection), or from Scots note, knoit (to knock), itself perhaps for *nite, from Old English hnītan (to strike; thrust; push; come against with a shock; butt).
RFV-failed. - -sche (discuss) 02:34, 7 February 2016 (UTC)