Wurm

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See also: wurm

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German wurm, from Old High German wurm, from Proto-Germanic *wurmiz, from Proto-Indo-European *wr̥mis. Cognate with Dutch worm, English worm, West Frisian wjirm, Danish orm, Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐌿𐍂𐌼𐍃 (waurms).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /vʊrm/, [vʊʁm], [vʊɐ̯m], [ʋ-]
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

Wurm m or n (genitive Wurmes or Wurms, plural Würmer or Würme, diminutive Würmchen n or Würmlein n)

  1. (biology) worm
  2. (informal) maggot, grub
  3. (archaic) any crawling animal, e.g. a reptile
  4. (poetic, heraldry) dragon, lindworm, wyrm
  5. (computing) worm
  6. (colloquial, endearing) a baby or small child; a mite; any helpless creature

Usage notes[edit]

  • The word is generally masculine in all senses. When meaning “baby, mite”, it may alternatively be neuter.
  • The normal plural is Würmer. The form Würme is archaic; it might still see some usage in the heraldic sense.

Declension[edit]

  • Rare neuter form:
  • Archaic plural:

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Saterland Frisian[edit]

n Wurm (1).
n Wurm (2).
n Wurm (3).

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian worm, from Proto-West Germanic *wurmi. Cognates include West Frisian wjirm and German Wurm.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Wurm m (plural Wurme)

  1. worm
  2. mite
  3. moth

Noun[edit]

Wurm n (plural Wurme)

  1. a miserable child
    Dät litje Wurm is heel un aal allänig!The poor little child is completely alone!

References[edit]

  • Marron C. Fort (2015), “Wurm”, in Saterfriesisches Wörterbuch mit einer phonologischen und grammatischen Übersicht, Buske, →ISBN