aequalis

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Learned borrowing from Latin aequālis (equal). Doublet of equal and egal.

Noun[edit]

aequalis

  1. (grammar) The case conveying an equality with another noun, equivalent to “like” or “as” in English. This case is used in some languages like Inuktitut.

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From aequus (equal, even) +‎ -ālis.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

aequālis (neuter aequāle, comparative aequālior, superlative aequālissimus, adverb aequāliter); third-declension two-termination adjective

  1. equal, like
    Synonyms: pār, compār, aequus, adaequātus
    Antonyms: inaequālis, impār, inīquus
  2. comparable, contemporary
  3. coeval, coexistent
  4. similar, resembling in size or form
    Synonym: similis
    Antonyms: dissimilis, absimilis, inaequālis
  5. uniform, equable, unvarying

Declension[edit]

Third-declension two-termination adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative aequālis aequāle aequālēs aequālia
Genitive aequālis aequālium
Dative aequālī aequālibus
Accusative aequālem aequāle aequālēs
aequālīs
aequālia
Ablative aequālī aequālibus
Vocative aequālis aequāle aequālēs aequālia

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • aequalis”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • aequalis”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • aequalis in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be a contemporary of a person: aequalem esse alicuius
  1. ^ “eguale, uguale” in: Alberto Nocentini, Alessandro Parenti, “l'Etimologico — Vocabolario della lingua italiana”, Le Monnier, 2010, →ISBN