amargo

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See also: amargó

Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

amargo

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of amargar

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese amargo, from Vulgar Latin *amāricus, from Latin amārus (bitter).

Adjective[edit]

amargo m (feminine singular amarga, masculine plural amargos, feminine plural amargas)

  1. bitter

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Ladino[edit]

Adjective[edit]

amargo m (Latin spelling)

  1. bitter

Related terms[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese amargo, from Vulgar Latin *amāricus, from Latin amārus (bitter), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃em-, *h₂eh₃m- (bitter, raw).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

amargo m (feminine singular amarga, masculine plural amargos, feminine plural amargas, comparable)

  1. referring to an unpleasant taste
    1. bitter, acrid
    2. with little or no sugar
    3. acid, spicy
  2. (figuratively) sad, gloomy, sorrowful
  3. (figuratively) rigid, strict, intolerant
  4. (figuratively) resentful

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • amargo in Dicionário Aberto based on Novo Diccionário da Língua Portuguesa de Cândido de Figueiredo, 1913

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin amārus (bitter), either through a Vulgar Latin root *amāricus or influenced by amargar. Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₃em-, *h₂eh₃m- (bitter, raw).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

amargo (feminine singular amarga, masculine plural amargos, feminine plural amargas)

  1. bitter, sour (having an acrid taste)

Noun[edit]

amargo m (plural amargos)

  1. bitterness
  2. sign (warning) (Can we add an example for this sense?)

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

amargo

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of amargar.

Further reading[edit]