amiable

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle English amyable, from Old French amiable, from Late Latin amīcābilis (friendly), from Latin amīcus (friend), from amō (I love). The meaning has been influenced by French aimable, Latin amābilis (loveable). Compare with amicable, amorous, amability.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈeɪ.mi.ə.bəl/, /ˈæ.mi.ə.bəl/

Adjective[edit]

amiable (comparative more amiable, superlative most amiable)

  1. Friendly; kind; sweet; gracious
    an amiable temper
    amiable ideas
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter III, in The Younger Set (Project Gutenberg; EBook #14852), New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, published 1 February 2005 (Project Gutenberg version), OCLC 24962326:
      A short time afterward at the opera Gerald dragged him into a parterre to say something amiable to one of the amiable débutante Craig girls—and Selwyn found himself again facing Alixe.
  2. Of a pleasant and likeable nature; kind-hearted; easy to like
    an amiable person
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter III, in The Younger Set (Project Gutenberg; EBook #14852), New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, published 1 February 2005 (Project Gutenberg version), OCLC 24962326:
      A short time afterward at the opera Gerald dragged him into a parterre to say something amiable to one of the amiable débutante Craig girls—and Selwyn found himself again facing Alixe.

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French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

amiable (plural amiables)

  1. amiable

Old French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

amiable m (oblique and nominative feminine singular amiable)

  1. likable; amiable

Descendants[edit]