amiable

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle English amyable, from Old French amiable, from Late Latin amīcābilis ‎(friendly), from Latin amīcus ‎(friend), from amō ‎(I love). The meaning has been influenced by French aimable, Latin amābilis ‎(loveable). Compare with amicable, amorous, amability.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈeɪ.mi.ə.bəl/, /ˈæ.mi.ə.bəl/

Adjective[edit]

amiable ‎(comparative more amiable, superlative most amiable)

  1. Friendly; kind; sweet; gracious; as, an amiable temper or mood; amiable ideas.
    • 1907, Robert W. Chambers, chapter III, The Younger Set:
      A short time afterward at the opera Gerald dragged him into a parterre to say something amiable to one of the amiable débutante Craig girls—and Selwyn found himself again facing Alixe.
  2. Possessing sweetness of disposition; having sweetness of temper; kindhearted; which causes one to be liked; as, an amiable person.
    • 1907, Robert W. Chambers, chapter III, The Younger Set:
      A short time afterward at the opera Gerald dragged him into a parterre to say something amiable to one of the amiable débutante Craig girls—and Selwyn found himself again facing Alixe.

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Old French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

amiable m, f

  1. likable; amiable

Descendants[edit]