armistice

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See also: Armistice

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

A celebration of the armistice on 11 November 1918 that marked the end of World War I

From Late Latin armistitium, from Latin arma (arms, weapons) + sistēre (from sistō (to halt, stand still), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂- (to stand up)) + -ium (suffix forming abstract nouns). The word is cognate with French armistice,[1] Italian armistizio, Portuguese armistício, Spanish armisticio.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

armistice (plural armistices)

  1. A (short) cessation of combat; a ceasefire, a truce. [from late 17th c.]
    • 1863 April 24, Francis Lieber, “Instructions for the Government of Armies of the United States in the Field [General Order No. 100]”, in General Orders Affecting the Volunteer Force (Adjutant General’s Office; 1863), Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, published 1864, OCLC 45457866, section VIII (Armistice—Capitulation), page 83:
      135. An armistice is the cessation of active hostilities for a period agreed upon between belligerents. It must be agreed upon in writing, and duly ratified by the highest authorities of the contending parties. / 136. If an armistice be declared, without conditions, it extends no further than to require a total cessation of hostilities, along the front of both belligerents.
    • 2002, Edward N[icolae] Luttwak, “The Coming Together of Opposites”, in Strategy: The Logic of War and Peace, revised and enlarged edition, Cambridge, Mass.; London: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, published 2003 (2nd printing), →ISBN, part I (The Logic of Strategy), pages 59–60:
      It has also become routine to interrupt wars in more lasting fashion by imposing armistices. Again, unless directly followed by successful peace negotiations, armistices perpetuate the state of war indefinitely because they shield the weaker side from the consequences of refusing the concessions needed for peace. [] Armistices in themselves are not way stations to peace but rather frozen wars.
  2. A formal agreement, especially between nations, to end combat.
    • 1797, John Debrett, compiler, “Preface”, in A Collection of State Papers, Relative to the War against France now Carrying on by Great Britain and the Several Other European Powers; [], volume V, London: Printed for J[ohn] Debrett, [], OCLC 520784460:
      The Fifth Volume of this Collection makes its appearance at the moſt eventful period of the war—it includes, therefore, matter of the higheſt importance, and contains all the official documents reſpecting the late Negotiation—the war between this country and Spain, the progreſs of the French arms in Italy and Germany—the armiſtices and treaties concluded with the German and Italian powers— []
    • 1813, [John Lowell Jr.], “No. IV. The Several Proposals for an Armistice Considered.”, in Perpetual War, the Policy of Mr. Madison. [], Boston, Mass.: Printed by C[hester] Stebbins, OCLC 191266103, page 17:
      The government of Great-Britain lost no time after the war was known, in making to our cabinet proposals for an armistice. Those proposals were like all propositions between equal states, perfectly reciprocal. They require of us to suspend hostilities only, in consideration of suspending hostilities on their part. They are silent as to impressments—and would any person inquire why? It may be answered, that impressments had never been presented to Great-Britain as in themselves the cause of war []
    • 2003, John Malam, “The Day Armistice was Signed”, in Mary-Jane Wilkins, editor, 11 November 1918: The World War I Armistice (Dates with History), London: CherrytreeBooks, Evans Brothers, →ISBN, pages 12–13:
      The day armistice was signed [chapter title] [] At five o'clock on the morning of 11 November 1918, a group of high-ranking German politicians and military officers entered a railway carriage in the Forest of Compiègne. They were met by delegates from the countries with which they had been at war. Three days earlier the French, British and Americans had prepared an armistice document which they demanded the Germans accept within three days. Inside the carriage the Germans signed the surrender document put before them. The document signalled that the war would stop in six hours' time, at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month of 1918.

Coordinate terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

armistice

  1. Alternative letter-case form of Armistice (the armistice agreement signed between the Allies and Germany on 11 November 1918 to end World War I; (by extension) the end of World War I.)
    • 2002, Allen Douglas, “Web of Memory”, in War, Memory, and the Politics of Humor: The Canard Enchaîné and World War I, Berkeley; Los Angeles, Calif.; London: University of California Press, →ISBN, page 151:
      The armistice of November 1918 could represent many things: the end of the war, the victory. But for the Carnard [the newspaper Le Canard enchaîné], first and foremost, it represented dissention among the French. [] After the armistice and the emergence of the first difficulties of the peace, many more both on the right and in the center argued that the armistice should have been signed in Berlin—in a word, the armistice of November 11 was premature.
    • 2018, Richard J. Connors, The Road to the Armistice 1918, Pittsburgh, Pa.: Dorrance Publishing Co., →ISBN, pages 66–67:
      Later he [British Prime Minister David Lloyd George] meets with the House of Commons and, after an opening prayer is said, reviews the armistice terms, then moves for adjournment.

References[edit]

  1. ^ armistice, n.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, June 2014.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Medieval Latin armistitium, from Latin arma (weapons) and statio (immobility) (compare solstitium). Cognate with Italian armistizio, Spanish armisticio.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

armistice m (plural armistices)

  1. armistice

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]