basil

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See also: Basil and BASIL

English[edit]

Ocimum basilicum

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French basile, from Medieval Latin basilicum, from Ancient Greek βασιλικόν (basilikón, royal), from βασιλεύς (basileús, king).

Noun[edit]

basil (usually uncountable, plural basils)

  1. A plant (Ocimum basilicum).
  2. The leaves of this plant used as a herb.
  3. Any other species in the genus Ocimum.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Variant of bezel.

Noun[edit]

basil (plural basils)

  1. The angle to which a joiner's tool is ground away.
    • 1683, Joseph Moxon, Mechanick Exercises
      apply it to the Basil of your Iron, in such a Position, that it may bear upon the whole breadth of the Basil ; and so working the Stone over the Basil , you will quickly wear the courser grating

Verb[edit]

basil (third-person singular simple present basils, present participle basilling, simple past and past participle basilled)

  1. (transitive) To grind the edge of a tool to an acute angle.
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Corrupted from English basan, from French basane, from Late Latin basanium, from Arabic بِطانَة(biṭāna, lining).

Noun[edit]

basil (plural basils)

  1. The skin of a sheep tanned with bark.
Synonyms[edit]

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for basil in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Dutch bacil, from French bacille, from German Bazillus or translingual Bacillus, coined by Christian Gottfried Ehrenberg.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈbasɪl]
  • Hyphenation: ba‧sil

Noun[edit]

basil

  1. bacillus

Etymology 2[edit]

From English basil, from Old French basile, from Medieval Latin basilicum, from Ancient Greek βασιλικόν (basilikón, royal), from βασιλεύς (basileús, king).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈbasɪl]
  • Hyphenation: ba‧sil

Noun[edit]

basil

  1. basil

Further reading[edit]