blithe

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English blithe, from Old English blīþe ‎(blithe, joyous, cheerful, pleasant; gracious, well-disposed, friendly, kind; agreeable, willing; quiet, peaceful, gentle), from Proto-Germanic *blīþiz ‎(mild, pleasing, friendly), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰlī- ‎(light, pleasant, fine), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰel- ‎(to shine). Cognate Scots blithe ‎(joyous, cheerful, happy, well-pleased), North Frisian blid ‎(happy, glad), Saterland Frisian bliede ‎(happy, joyous, blithe), West Frisian bliid ‎(glad, happy, joyful, joyous), Dutch blijde, blij ‎(blithe, happy, joyous, glad), German dialectal blid, blied ‎(glad, happy, cheerful), Danish blid ‎(gentle), Swedish blid ‎(mild, gentle, bland), Icelandic blíður ‎(gentle, kind, friendly, mild). Related to bliss.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

blithe ‎(comparative blither, superlative blithest)

  1. (dated or literary) Happy, cheerful.
  2. Indifferent, careless, showing a lack of concern.
    She had a blithe disregard of cultures outside the United States.

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Translations[edit]


Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old English blīþe, from Proto-Germanic *blīþiz. Cognate with Danish blid, Dutch blij, Icelandic blíður. Compare bliss.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

blithe (comparative blither, superlative blithest)

  1. Happy
A howp ye haed a blithe birthday - I hope you had a happy birthday