cabotage

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French cabotage (coasting trade), from caboter (to travel by the coast). It originally (16th c.) referred to restrictions allowing only French ships to trade or transport between French ports. Other countries adopted this concept and extended it to land and air travel.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈkæbətɪdʒ/, /ˈkabətɑːʒ/

Noun[edit]

cabotage (countable and uncountable, plural cabotages)

  1. The transport of goods or passengers between two points in the same country.
    • 1943, William Armistead Moale Burden, The Struggle for Airways in Latin America, page 51:
      Cabotage traffic may be carried by a foreign carrier on special permission of the civil aeronautics authorities  [].
  2. (law) The right to engage in such transport.
    • 2002, Kevin Colin Ingram, Xingang Li, Maritime Law and Policy in China, page 19
      Cabotage, used as a legal term, here refers to the right to transport goods or passengers between ports of a country.
  3. The exclusive right of a country to control such transport.
    • 1992, Pablo Mendes de Leon, Cabotage in Air Transport Regulation, OCLC 25915610, page 104:
      Professor Levine distinguishes two kinds of cabotage: "primary cabotage" which can be compared with ninth freedom cabotages and "long-haul limited cabotage" which can be compared with eighth freedom cabotage  [].

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

caboter +‎ -age

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cabotage m (plural cabotages)

  1. cabotage

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]