cabrito

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish cabrito (kid).

Noun[edit]

cabrito (uncountable)

  1. (cooking) Meat from a young goat; kid.
    • 1995, Cheryl Alters Jamison, Bill Jamison, The Border Cookbook: Authentic Home Cooking of the American Southwest and Northern Mexico, page 223,
      Mutton rivaled beef in prominence until this century, and cabrito, or kid, remains a major food in Nuevo León.
    • 2001, Mary Faulk Koock, The Texas Cookbook: From Barbecue to Banquet-- An Informal View of Dining and Entertaining the Texas Way[1], page 65:
      Mr. Dean O. Smith, who is the game warden in the Dripping Springs area, barbecues the cabrito for us, and what a treat that is! Cabrito is a very young Spanish goat between one and a half and two years old.
    • 2013, Philipp Meyer, The Son, Simon & Schuster 2014, p. 116:
      Consuela and Sullivan had been cooking all night so there was plenty of beef and cabrito.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese cabrito (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria): cabra +‎ -ito; may have originally corresponded to a Vulgar Latin or Late Latin caprītus (attested in Salic Law). Cognate with Portuguese cabrito and Spanish cabrito.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cabrito m (plural cabritos, feminine cabrito, feminine plural cabritos)

  1. kid (young goat)
    Synonyms: cabuxo, rexelo

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • cabrito” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2022.
  • cabrito” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2018.
  • cabrito” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • cabrito” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • cabrito” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Old Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From cabra (goat) +‎ -ito. Compare Old Portuguese cabrito.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cabrito m (plural cabritos)

  1. kid (young goat)
    • c. 1200, Almerich, Fazienda de Ultramar, f. 5v.
      priſieró la ueſtidura. de ioſeph e degollaron vn cabrito. ¬ enſangrétaró la en la ſangre. ¬ enbiaró la aſo padre q́ la connocieſſe. e dixieron eſto fallamos
      [Then] they took Joseph's clothing and beheaded a young goat, and bloodied it in its blood. And they sent it to their father, that he would recognize it, and said, “We found this.”

Descendants[edit]

  • Spanish: cabrito

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

cabra +‎ -ito; from Old Galician and Old Portuguese cabrito (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria). May have originally corresponded to a Vulgar Latin or Late Latin caprītus (attested in Salic Law), from *caprīre, from Latin caper (which would have normally yielded *cabrido), but was influenced by the Portuguese diminutive suffix -ito (from Late Latin -ittus). Compare Spanish cabrito, Aragonese crabido, crabito, crapito, Catalan and Occitan cabrit, French dialectal chevri.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cabrito m (plural cabritos, feminine cabrita, feminine plural cabritas)

  1. kid (young goat)

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Spanish cabrito. Analyzable as cabra (goat) +‎ -ito; may have originally corresponded to a Vulgar Latin or Late Latin caprītus (attested in Salic Law), as the perfect passive participle of a verb *caprīre (give birth (of goats)), from Latin caper (which would have normally yielded *cabrido), but was influenced by the Spanish diminutive suffix -ito (from Late Latin -ittus). Compare Portuguese cabrito, Aragonese crabido, crabito, crapito, Catalan cabrit, Occitan cabrit, dialectal French chevri.[1].

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kaˈbɾito/, [kaˈβ̞ɾi.t̪o]

Noun[edit]

cabrito m (plural cabritos)

  1. kid (young goat)

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]