cloch

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Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish cloch (compare Welsh clog).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cloch f (genitive singular cloiche, nominative plural clocha)

  1. stone
    1. stone (substance; small piece of stone)
    2. stone (central part of some fruits, consisting of the seed and a hard endocarp layer)
    3. (Christianity) bead (in a rosary)
    4. hard lump
    5. (anatomy) testicle
    6. stone (unit of mass)
  2. rocky shore
  3. rocky island
  4. (stone) castle

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

cloch (present analytic clochann, future analytic clochfaidh, verbal noun clochadh, past participle clochta)

  1. (transitive) stone

Conjugation[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cloch chloch gcloch
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • "cloch" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • cloch” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cloch f

  1. stone, rock
  2. stone (as material)
  3. precious stone, gem
  4. (Christianity) bead (in a rosary)
  5. something built of stone, castle, fortress, stronghold

Inflection[edit]

Feminine ā-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative
Vocative
Accusative
Genitive
Dative
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
cloch chloch cloch
pronounced with /ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • cloch” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

cloch m (plural cloches)

  1. Alternative form of cloche

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Welsh [Term?], borrowed from Late Latin clocca (bell) (compare Cornish clogh, Breton kloc'h, Old Irish cloc, Irish clog).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cloch f (plural clych or clychau)

  1. bell
    1. (figuratively) someone who praises or proclaims
    2. (figuratively) bell-shaped object, especially bubble
    3. (figuratively) bell-like sound or noise, vociferation
  2. prize, feat
  3. o'clock, of the clock

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cloch gloch nghloch chloch
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • cloch”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies, 2014