cras

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See also: Cras and crás

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cras (feminine crassa, masculine plural crassos, feminine plural crasses)

  1. gross (great, serious, flagrant, or shameful)

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *krās, probably from Proto-Indo-European *ḱerh₂- (head, top).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

crās (not comparable)

  1. tomorrow
    Crās Mārcus lūdōs vidēbit.
    Tomorrow, Marcus will see the games.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Italian: crai (archaic, literary)
  • Neapolitan: craje
  • Old Portuguese: cras
  • Old Spanish: cras
  • Sardinian: cras

Antonyms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “cras”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin crassus.

Noun[edit]

cras m (oblique plural cras, nominative singular cras, nominative plural cras)

  1. fat (body fat)

Descendants[edit]


Old Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin crās (tomorrow).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

cras

  1. tomorrow

Descendants[edit]

See also[edit]


Old Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Latin crās.

Adverb[edit]

cras

  1. tomorrow
    • c. 1140 – 1207, anonymous, Poem of the Cid 537-538:
      Todos ſodes pagados ¬ ninguno nõ por pagar / Cras ala mañana penſemos de caualgaR
      All of you have been paid, none remains to be paid / Tomorrow morning let's get ready to ride

Descendants[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French crasse.

Adjective[edit]

cras m or n (feminine singular crasă, masculine plural crași, feminine and neuter plural crase)

  1. crass

Declension[edit]


Sardinian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin crās.

Adverb[edit]

cras

  1. tomorrow

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Spanish cras, inherited from Latin crās.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɾas/, [ˈkɾas]

Adverb[edit]

cras

  1. (obsolete) tomorrow
    Synonym: mañana
    • 1589, Juan de Pineda, Diálogos familiares de la agricultura cristiana 58:
      La corneja dice con su canto cras, cras, que quiere decir mañana; mañana, también como el canto de los cuervos; y ansí los que viven de esperanzas pasan de día en día, prometiéndose buenaventura para los venideros, y porque en la materia de virtudes es mal caso dejar para mañana el bien, que hoy se puede hacer, condena Dios en la ley por aves inmundas a todos los linajes de cuervos, que siempre dicen cras o mañana.
      A small crow says in its song, cras cras, which means 'tomorrow', so does the song of regular crows. This is how those who live off hope pass their days, promising to themselves better times in future days. Among virtues, it is bad form to leave the good that can be done today till tomorrow, and so God condemns all types of crows as foul birds, because they say cras, that is 'tomorrow'.

Usage notes[edit]

Already obsolescent by the late 16th century.

Further reading[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Cornish kras (toasted).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cras (feminine singular cras, plural creision, equative crased, comparative crasach, superlative crasaf)

  1. dry, parched, scorched
  2. rough, coarse, rude
  3. harsh, grating

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

cras m (plural creision)

  1. Something dried or scorched.

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “cras”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies