culantro

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English[edit]

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 culantro on Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish culantro, whence also cilantro, which see for more.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kuːˈlɑːn.tɹoʊ/, /kuːˈlæn.tɹoʊ/

Noun[edit]

culantro (uncountable)

  1. The tropical herb Eryngium foetidum, native to Mexico, Central America and South America but cultivated worldwide, used medicinally and in Caribbean cuisine.
    Synonyms: (Caribbean) chadon beni, (Barbados, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago) fitweed
    • 2007 January 21, Timothy Williams, “As East Harlem Develops, Its Accent Starts to Change”, in New York Times[1]:
      A painting of a woman wearing a burgundy shawl over a flamenco-style dress hangs on a wall, and in the garden, tomatoes, peppers, corn and culantro, an herb used in Caribbean cooking, grow in the summer.
  2. Alternative form of cilantro

Usage notes[edit]

Not to be confused with cilantro.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Old Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin coliandrum, from Latin coriandrum (coriander), from Ancient Greek κορίανδρον (koríandron).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

culantro m (plural culantros)

  1. coriander, cilantro
    • c. 1200, Almerich, Fazienda de Ultramar, f. 17r.
      Clamaron caſado de iſŕl ſo nóbre magna caera como ſemẏent de culantro blanco. E ſo ſabor como breſcas de myel
      The house of Israel gave it the name manna, because it was like the seed of white coriander, and its taste like that of honeycombs.

Descendants[edit]

  • Spanish: cilantro

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Spanish culantro, from Late Latin coliandrum, from Latin coriandrum (coriander), from Ancient Greek κορίανδρον (koríandron).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kuˈlantɾo/, [kuˈlãn̪.t̪ɾo]

Noun[edit]

culantro m (plural culantros)

  1. Alternative form of cilantro
  2. (euphemistic, colloquial, Costa Rica, Mexico) butt, buttocks

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]