delf

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See also: DELF

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English delf, delve, dælf (a quarry, clay pit, hole; an artificial watercourse, a canal, a ditch, a trench; a grave; a pitfall), from Old English delf, ġedelf (delving, digging) and dælf (that which is dug, delf, ditch), from Proto-Germanic *delbaną (to dig). More at delve.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

delf (plural delves)

  1. A mine, quarry, pit dug; ditch.
  2. (heraldry) A charge representing a square sod.
  3. Alternative form of delft (style of earthenware)
    • 1864, Browning, Robert, “Mr. Sludge, "The Medium"”, in Wikisource, line 832[1], retrieved 2012-01-18:
      That's all—do what we do, but noblier done— / Use plate, whereas we eat our meals off delf, / (To use a figure).
    • 1941, Sarah Atherton, Mark's Own, Bobbs-Merrill:
      Men can't munch from meatless pots and doughless delf.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for delf in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Verb[edit]

delf

  1. first-person singular present indicative of delven
  2. imperative of delven

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

delf ?

  1. Delft (a city)

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • delf”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English delf, from delfan (Middle English delven).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

delf (plural delves)

  1. A quarry (pit for digging stone or clay).
  2. A man-made channel or stream; a water-filled ditch.
  3. A hole or ditch; a delf.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the verb delfan (to delve, dig, dig out, burrow, bury), from Proto-Germanic *delbaną, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰelbʰ-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

delf n (nominative plural delf)

  1. digging, excavation; what is dug, trench, quarry, canal

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]