dug

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

dug

  1. simple past and past participle of dig (replacing earlier digged)

Etymology 2[edit]

From earlier dugge ("pap, teat"; compare also English dialectal ducky, dukky (the female breast)), apparently connected to Danish dægge (to suckle), Swedish dägga (to suck), Old English dēon (to suckle). More at doe. Compare doug

Noun[edit]

dug (plural dugs)

  1. (chiefly in the plural) A mammary gland on a domestic mammal with more than two breasts.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse dǫgg (dew), from Proto-Germanic *dawwō, *dawwaz (dew), cognate with Swedish dagg, English dew, German Tau (dew), Dutch dauw.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /duɡ/, [ˈd̥uɡ̊]

Noun[edit]

dug c (singular definite duggen, not used in plural form)

  1. dew
Declension[edit]

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Low German dūk, dōk, from Proto-Germanic *dōkaz, cognate with German Tuch, Dutch doek (Old Norse dúkr is also borrowed from Low German).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /duːˀ/, [ˈd̥uˀ]

Noun[edit]

dug c (singular definite dugen, plural indefinite duge)

  1. tablecloth (a cloth used to cover and protect a table, especially for a dining table)
  2. a piece of canvas or cloth
  3. a piece of bunting (material from which flags are made)
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Uralic *tuŋke-. Cognate with Finnish tunkea, Erzya [script needed] (tongoms).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dug

  1. (transitive) to stick, tuck, insert, push in (into something: -ba/-be)
    Synonym: illeszt
  2. (transitive) to hide, conceal (into some place: lative suffixes)
    Synonym: (literary) rejt
  3. (transitive, intransitive, informal) to have sex
    Synonyms: szexel, kefél

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

(With verbal prefixes):

Expressions

Further reading[edit]

  • dug in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • dug in Ittzés, Nóra (ed.). A magyar nyelv nagyszótára (‘A Comprehensive Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 2006–2031 (work in progress; published A–ez as of 2024)

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

dug

  1. (rare, Early Middle English) Alternative form of duk (duke)

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Verb[edit]

dug

  1. imperative of duga

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English docga (hound, powerful breed of dog). Cognate with English dog.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dug (plural dugs)

  1. dog

Verb[edit]

dug (third-person singular simple present dugs, present participle duggin, simple past duggit, past participle duggit)

  1. To stand up to; to outlast.

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *dъlgъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dȗg m (Cyrillic spelling ду̑г)

  1. debt
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *dьlgъ, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *dílˀgas. Cognate with Czech dlouhý.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dȕg (definite dȕgī, comparative dȕžī, Cyrillic spelling ду̏г)

  1. long
Declension[edit]

Sumerian[edit]

Romanization[edit]

dug

  1. Romanization of 𒂁 (dug)

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dug

  1. imperative of duga

Anagrams[edit]

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Middle English duk, itself a borrowing from Old French duc, from Latin dux.

Noun[edit]

dug m (plural dugiaid, feminine duges)

  1. duke
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Inflected form of dwyn (to steal).

Verb[edit]

dug

  1. (obsolete, literary) third-person singular past of dwyn

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
dug ddug nug unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “dug”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

Yola[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English dogge, from Old English docga.

Noun[edit]

dug (plural duggès or dugges or duges)

  1. dog
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 71:
      Dinna thar a dug.
      Don't vex the dog.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 36