delicatessen

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English[edit]

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French delicacies sold in delicatessens

Etymology[edit]

First attested 1864. From German Delikatessen, plural of Delikatesse (delicacy, fine food), at the time also spelt Delicatesse(n), from French délicatesse, from délicat (fine), from Latin delicatus (alluring).

The sense of store is much more recent, originating in ellipsis from the common attributive use, as in delicatessen shop, delicatessen store, etc.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌdɛlɪkəˈtɛsən/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

delicatessen (plural delicatessens)

  1. A shop that sells cooked or prepared foods ready for serving.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

delicatessen pl (plural only)

  1. Delicacies; exotic or expensive foods.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

First attested 1642 [1]. Plural of delicatesse (fine food), from French délicatesse, from délicat (fine), from Latin delicatus (alluring).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

delicatessen

  1. delicacies, fine food
  2. Plural form of delicatesse

Synonyms[edit]

  1. lekkernijen

Further reading[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

delicatessen f (plural delicatessens)

  1. delicatessen (shop selling prepared foods)

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English delicatessen, from German Delikatessen.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /delikaˈtesen/, [d̪e.li.kaˈt̪e.sẽn]

Noun[edit]

delicatessen f (plural delicatessens)

  1. delicatessen

Usage notes[edit]

According to Royal Spanish Academy (RAE) prescriptions, unadapted foreign words should be written in italics in a text printed in roman type, and vice versa, and in quotation marks in a manuscript text or when italics are not available. In practice, this RAE prescription is not always followed.

Alternative forms[edit]

Further reading[edit]