exotic

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See also: exòtic

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French exotique, from Latin exōticus, from Ancient Greek ἐξωτικός (exōtikós, foreign, literally from the outside), from ἐξω- (exō-, outside), from ἐξ (ex, out of).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɪɡˈzɒtɪk/
    • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɪɡˈzɑtɪk/
  • Rhymes: -ɒtɪk

Adjective[edit]

exotic (comparative more exotic, superlative most exotic)

  1. Foreign, especially in an exciting way.
    an exotic appearance
    • 1682 December 4 (Gregorian calendar), John Evelyn, “[Diary entry for 24 November 1682]”, in William Bray, editor, Memoirs, Illustrative of the Life and Writings of John Evelyn, [], volume I, 2nd edition, London: Henry Colburn, []; and sold by John and Arthur Arch, [], published 1819, OCLC 976971842:
      Nothing was so splendid and exotic as the ambassador.
    • 1905, Baroness Emmuska Orczy, chapter 2, in The Tremarn Case[1]:
      “Two or three months more went by ; the public were eagerly awaiting the arrival of this semi-exotic claimant to an English peerage, and sensations, surpassing those of the Tichbourne case, were looked forward to with palpitating interest. […]”
    • 2013 June 29, “Travels and travails”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8842, page 55:
      Even without hovering drones, a lurking assassin, a thumping score and a denouement, the real-life story of Edward Snowden, a rogue spy on the run, could be straight out of the cinema. But, as with Hollywood, the subplots and exotic locations may distract from the real message: America’s discomfort and its foes’ glee.
  2. Non-native to the ecosystem.
  3. (finance) Being or relating to an option with features that make it more complex than commonly traded options.
  4. (gambling) Being or relating to various wagers, such as the trifecta, that involve betting on the finishing positions of multiple competitors across one or more races.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun[edit]

exotic (plural exotics)

  1. (biology) An organism that is exotic to an environment.
    • c.1948, George Orwell, Such, Such Were the Joys
      There were a few exotics among them — some South American boys, sons of Argentine beef barons, one or two Russians, and even a Siamese prince, or someone who was described as a prince.
  2. An exotic dancer; a stripteaser.
  3. (physics) Any exotic particle.
    Glueballs, theoretical particles composed only of gluons, are exotics.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin exōticus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

exotic m (feminine singular exotica, masculine plural exotics, feminine plural exoticas)

  1. exotic

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French exotique, from Latin exoticus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

exotic m or n (feminine singular exotică, masculine plural exotici, feminine and neuter plural exotice)

  1. exotic

Declension[edit]