delude

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English deluden, from Latin dēlūdō (mock, deceive), from de + lūdō ("I make sport of, I mock"). See ludicrous.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

delude (third-person singular simple present deludes, present participle deluding, simple past and past participle deluded)

  1. (transitive) To deceive into believing something which is false; to lead into error; to dupe.
    • 2012 August 5, Nathan Rabin, “TV: Review: THE SIMPSONS (CLASSIC): “I Love Lisa” (season 4, episode 15; originally aired 02/11/1993)”, in (Please provide the book title or journal name)[1]:
      Ralph Wiggum is generally employed as a bottomless fount of glorious non sequiturs, but in “I Love Lisa” he stands in for every oblivious chump who ever deluded himself into thinking that with persistence, determination, and a pure heart he can win the girl of his dreams.
    • (Can we date this quote by Burke and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      To delude the nation by an airy phantom.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To frustrate or disappoint.
    • (Can we date this quote by Dryden and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      It deludes thy search.

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Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

delude

  1. third-person singular present of deludere

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

dēlūde

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of dēlūdō

Middle English[edit]

Verb[edit]

delude

  1. Alternative form of deluden

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

delude

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of deludir.
  2. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of deludir.
  3. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of deludir.