flinch

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle French flenchir (to bend), of Germanic origin. Compare Middle High German lenken (to bend). Attested in English since the 16th century.

Noun[edit]

flinch (plural flinches)

  1. A reflexive jerking away.
    My eye doctor hates the flinch I have every time he tries to get near my eyes.
  2. (croquet) The slipping of the foot from a ball, when attempting to give a tight croquet.
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]
  • (reflexive jerking away): cringe

Verb[edit]

flinch (third-person singular simple present flinches, present participle flinching, simple past and past participle flinched)

  1. (intransitive) To make a sudden, involuntary movement in response to a (usually negative) stimulus; to cringe.
    • 1693 John Locke, Some Thoughts Concerning Education:
      A child, by a constant course of kindness, may be accustomed to bear very rough usage without flinching or complaining.
  2. To dodge (a question), to avoid an unpleasant task or duty
  3. (croquet) To let the foot slip from a ball, when attempting to give a tight croquet.
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

flinch (third-person singular simple present flinches, present participle flinching, simple past and past participle flinched)

  1. Alternative form of flense

References[edit]