fugue

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See also: fugué

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from French, from Italian fuga ‎(flight, ardor), from Latin fuga ‎(act of fleeing), from fugere ‎(to flee); compare Ancient Greek φυγή ‎(phugḗ). Apparently from the metaphor that the first part starts alone on its course, and is pursued by later parts.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fugue ‎(plural fugues)

  1. (music) A contrapuntal piece of music wherein a particular melody is played in a number of voices, each voice introduced in turn by playing the melody.
  2. Anything in literature, poetry, film, painting, etc., that resembles a fugue in structure or in its elaborate complexity and formality.

Translations[edit]

Related terms[edit]

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French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fugue

  1. first-person singular present indicative of fuguer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of fuguer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of fuguer
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of fuguer
  5. second-person singular imperative of fuguer

Noun[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia fr

fugue f ‎(plural fugues)

  1. (informal) running away (from a place where one was staying)
  2. (music) fugue

Synonyms[edit]

  • (running away): fuite : flight, fleeing

External links[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

fugue

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of fugar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of fugar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of fugar.