gusty

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From gust +‎ -y.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gusty (comparative gustier, superlative gustiest)

  1. (of wind) Blowing in gusts; blustery; tempestuous.
    • 1906, Alfred Noyes, The Highwayman:
      The wind was a torrent of darkness among the gusty trees,
      The moon was a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas,
      The road was a ribbon of moonlight over the purple moor,
      And the highwayman came riding—
      Riding—riding—
      The highwayman came riding, up to the old inn-door.
  2. (figuratively) Impassioned.
    • 2003, Lauren Henderson, My Lurid Past, page 48:
      A gusty sigh preceded the inevitable bad news. “You know that gig I was up for?” he asked rhetorically. “I didn't get it.”

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Lower Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *gǫstъ (dense). Cognate with Upper Sorbian husty, Polish gęsty, Czech hustý, Serbo-Croatian gȗst, and Russian густо́й (gustój)

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gusty (comparative gusćejšy, superlative nejgusćejšy, adverb gusto)

  1. thick, dense

Declension[edit]