keek

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See also: kè-e̍k

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English kyken, kiken, keken(to look, peep), possibly from Middle Dutch kiken or Middle Low German kīken(to look, peep), from Old Saxon *kīkan(to look), from Proto-Germanic *kīkaną(to look). Cognate with Dutch kijken(to look), German Low German kieken(to look), Estonian kiikama(to look, to peek), German kucken, gucken(to look), Danish kigge, kikke(to look, peep), Swedish kika(to peep, peek, keek, pry), Icelandic kíkja(to look, check). Perhaps related to kick.

The words peek, keek and peep were used more or less synonymously in the 14th and 15th centuries.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

keek ‎(third-person singular simple present keeks, present participle keeking, simple past and past participle keeked)

  1. To peek; peep.
    The man keeked over the fence.

Noun[edit]

keek ‎(plural keeks)

  1. A look, especially a quick one; a peek.

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • keek” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.
  • keek” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

keek

  1. singular past indicative of kijken

Anagrams[edit]


Scots[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Possibly from Middle English kiken.

Verb[edit]

keek ‎(third-person singular present keeks, present participle keekin, past keeked, past participle keeked)

  1. To have a quick look or peek.
  2. To tilt or lean back.
Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

keek ‎(plural keeks)

  1. A quick look or peek.

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

keek ‎(plural keeks)

  1. A cap made of linen worn around the head and neck.

References[edit]

  • keek” in Dictionary of the Scots Language, Scottish Language Dictionaries, Edinburgh"