locutor

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin locūtor (speaker, talker).

Noun[edit]

locutor (plural locutors)

  1. A speaker (one who talks).
    • 1984, Urban Pidgins and Creoles: Papers from the York Creole Conference:
      A position that solely insinuates a down-grading effect in the use of FT, engenders the impression of reducing the native locutor to a "sociolinguistic automaton" (Smith/Giles 1978: 10) that reflects a one-to-one relationship between ethnic bias and linguistic output.
    • 2006, Alan J. E. Wolf, Subjectivity in a Second Language: Conveying the Expression of Self (→ISBN), page 186:
      In conclusion, learners conveyed subjectivity by means of the diegetic present and the foregrounded imperfect but did so less frequently and in shorter stretches of text than native speakers in the expression of the native locutor's subjective involvement with his own discourse.
    • 2007, William M. Tepfenhart, Walling Cyre, Conceptual Structures: Standards and Practices: 7th International Conference on Conceptual Structures, ICCS'99, Blacksburg, VA, USA, July 12-15, 1999, Proceedings, Springer (→ISBN), page 151:
      We think of locutors' interactions as exchanges of conversational objects (COs). A conversational object is a mental attitude (belief, goal, wish, etc.) along with a positioning which a narrator transfers to another locutor during a conversation [13]. The locutor positions herself relative to a mental attitude by performing actions like "proposing", "accepting", "rejecting"; this is called the locutor's positioning relative to that mental attitude.

Usage notes[edit]

  • This term was very rare until the mid-1900s, and is still less than a thousandth as common as speaker.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ (locutor*1500),speaker at Google Ngram Viewer

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin locūtor.

Noun[edit]

locutor m (plural locutors)

  1. speaker
  2. presenter; host (on TV, radio)

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From loquor +‎ -tor.

Noun[edit]

locūtor m (genitive locūtōris); third declension

  1. speaker, talker

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative locūtor locūtōrēs
Genitive locūtōris locūtōrum
Dative locūtōrī locūtōribus
Accusative locūtōrem locūtōrēs
Ablative locūtōre locūtōribus
Vocative locūtor locūtōrēs

Descendants[edit]

  • Catalan: locutor
  • English: locutor
  • French: locuteur
  • Portuguese: locutor
  • Spanish: locutor

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin locūtor.

Noun[edit]

locutor m (plural locutores, feminine locutora, feminine plural locutoras)

  1. announcer; commentator (one who makes announcements or comments on radio or TV)

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin locūtor.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /lokuˈtoɾ/, [lokuˈt̪oɾ]

Noun[edit]

locutor m (plural locutores, feminine locutora, feminine plural locutoras)

  1. (media) announcer, newscaster, newsreader, commentator

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]