mambo

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See also: Mambo

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Haitian Creole mambo (voodoo priestess) (ultimately from Yoruba mambo (to talk)), in later senses via Cuban Spanish mambo (dance).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mambo (countable and uncountable, plural mambos or mamboes)

  1. A voodoo priestess (in Haiti) [from 20th c.]
    • 1985, Wade Davis, The Serpent and the Rainbow, Simon & Schuster, p. 47:
      The mambo next presented a container of water to the cardinal points, then poured libations to the centerpost of the peristyle, the axis along which the spirits were to enter.
    • 1995, Karen McCarthy Brown, in Cosentino (ed.), Sacred Arts of Haitian Vodou, South Sea International Press 1998, p. 219:
      The manbo showed her how to take small handfuls of liquid and spread it on her skin always moving in the upward direction.
  2. A Latin-American musical genre, adapted from rumba, originating from Cuba in the 1940s, or a dance or rhythm of this genre. [from 20th c.]

Alternative forms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

mambo (third-person singular simple present mambos, present participle mamboing, simple past and past participle mamboed)

  1. (intransitive) To perform this dance.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

mambo n

  1. mambo (dance)

Further reading[edit]

  • mambo in Kartotéka Novočeského lexikálního archivu

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From American & Cuban Spanish mambo

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mambo m (plural mambos)

  1. mambo (music)
  2. mambo (dance)

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From American & Cuban Spanish mambo

Noun[edit]

mambo m (invariable)

  1. mambo (dance and music)

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From American & Cuban Spanish mambo

Noun[edit]

mambo m (plural mambos)

  1. mambo (music)
  2. mambo (dance)

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From American Spanish, likely from Haitian Creole, ultimately from Yoruba mambo (to talk).

Noun[edit]

mambo m (plural mambos)

  1. mambo (music)
  2. mambo (dance)

Swahili[edit]

Noun[edit]

mambo

  1. plural of jambo

Interjection[edit]

mambo

  1. (colloquial) how are you?

Swedish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Probably from Haitian Creole mambo.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mambo c

  1. (dance) mambo; a type of Latin American dance
Declension[edit]
Declension of mambo 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative mambo mambon mambor mamborna
Genitive mambos mambons mambors mambornas

Etymology 2[edit]

Blend of mamma (mum) +‎ sambo.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): (sometimes proscribed) /ˈmambʊ/
  • IPA(key): /²mamˌbuː/

Noun[edit]

mambo c

  1. (somewhat humorous) a person who still lives with their parents
Usage notes[edit]
  • For notes on the pronunciation, see the usage notes under the entry sambo.
Declension[edit]
Declension of mambo 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative mambo mambon mambor mamborna
Genitive mambos mambons mambors mambornas
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]