mank

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English manken, from Old English mancian, bemancian ‎(to maim, mutilate), of obscure origin. Cognate with Dutch and Middle Low German mank ‎(lame, defective), Middle High German manc ‎(lack, defect). Perhaps from Latin mancus ‎(maimed, crippled, frail, incomplete), from Proto-Indo-European *mank-, *menk- ‎(maimed, mutilation, torment).

Verb[edit]

mank ‎(third-person singular simple present manks, present participle manking, simple past and past participle manked)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To mutilate.
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Via Polari, from Italian mancare ‎(to be lacking), from Latin mancus ‎(maimed). See above.

Adjective[edit]

mank ‎(not comparable)

  1. (Britain, slang, originally Polari) Disgusting, repulsive.
    When he eats, he never closes his mouth. It's so mank.
Synonyms[edit]

Noun[edit]

mank ‎(uncountable)

  1. (Britain, slang, originally Polari) Something that is disgusting or manky.
    The plumber had to get all the mank out of the drain.



Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mank ‎(comparative manker, superlative mankst)

  1. lame

Declension[edit]

Inflection of mank
uninflected mank
inflected manke
comparative manker
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial mank manker het mankst
het mankste
indefinite m./f. sing. manke mankere mankste
n. sing. mank manker mankste
plural manke mankere mankste
definite manke mankere mankste
partitive manks mankers

Related terms[edit]