mangle

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See also: Mangle

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmæŋ.ɡəl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æŋɡəl

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English mangelen, from Anglo-Norman mangler, mahangler, frequentative of either Old French mangonner (to cut to pieces) or mahaigner (to mutilate), of Germanic origin, for which see mayhem.

Alternate etymology derives mangle from Middle English *mankelen, a frequentative form of manken (to mutilate), from Old English mancian, bemancian (to maim). More at mank.

Verb[edit]

mangle (third-person singular simple present mangles, present participle mangling, simple past and past participle mangled)

  1. (transitive) To change, mutilate or disfigure by cutting, tearing, rearranging etc.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 6”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker [] [a]nd by Robert Boulter [] [a]nd Matthias Walker, [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:
      mangled with ghastly wounds through plate and mail
    • (Can we date this quote by Jonathan Swift and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      when they are disposed to mangle a play or novel
  2. (transitive, computing) To modify (an identifier from source code) so as to produce a unique identifier for internal use by the compiler, etc.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch mangel, from late Middle High German mangel, enhanced form of mange, originally “mangonel”, from Medieval Latin manga, manganum. Doublet of mangonel. Cognate with German Mangel, Dutch mangel, both “mangle”.

Noun[edit]

mangle (plural mangles)

hand mangle
  1. A hand-operated device with rollers, for wringing laundry.
  2. The mangle attached to wringer washing machines, often called the wringer.
    • 1993, John Banville, Ghosts:
      There was a bright-red plastic baby-bath, a car tyre, a rusty mangle, and something that looked like a primitive version of a washing machine.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

mangle (third-person singular simple present mangles, present participle mangling, simple past and past participle mangled)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To wring laundry.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

mangle (plural mangles)

  1. mangrove (tree)

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish mangle.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mangle m (plural mangles)

  1. mangrove

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German mangeln (to lack).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /manɡlə/, [ˈmɑŋlə]

Verb[edit]

mangle (imperative mangl, infinitive at mangle, present tense mangler, past tense manglede, perfect tense er/har manglet)

  1. lack
  2. want
  3. need
  4. be missing
  5. be lacking
  6. be absent

German[edit]

Verb[edit]

mangle

  1. First-person singular present of mangeln.
  2. Imperative singular of mangeln.
  3. First-person singular subjunctive I of mangeln.
  4. Third-person singular subjunctive I of mangeln.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German mangeln

Verb[edit]

mangle (imperative mangl or mangle, present tense mangler, simple past and past participle mangla or manglet, present participle manglende)

  1. to lack (something)

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Galibi Carib or Taíno/Arawak

Noun[edit]

mangle m (plural mangles)

  1. mangrove