mannerism

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See also: Mannerism

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

manner +‎ -ism

Noun[edit]

mannerism (plural mannerisms)

  1. A group of verbal or other unconscious habitual behaviors peculiar to an individual.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 1, The Celebrity:
      In the old days, to my commonplace and unobserving mind, he gave no evidences of genius whatsoever. He never read me any of his manuscripts, […], and therefore my lack of detection of his promise may in some degree be pardoned. But he had then none of the oddities and mannerisms which I hold to be inseparable from genius, and which struck my attention in after days when I came in contact with the Celebrity.
  2. Exaggerated or effected style in art, speech, or other behavior.
Translations[edit]
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References[edit]
  • APA Dictionary of Psychology, 2007

Etymology 2[edit]

From Italian manierismo, from maniera, coined by L. Lanzi at the end of the XVIII century.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

mannerism (plural mannerisms)

  1. (art, literature) In literature, an ostentatious and unnatural style of the second half of the sixteenth century. In the contemporary criticism, described as a negation of the classicist equilibrium, pre-Baroque, and deforming expressiveness.
  2. (art, literature) In fine art, a style that is inspired by previous models, aiming to reproduce subjects in an expressive language.