minutia

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin minutia, from minūtus (small, little), from minuō (make smaller).

Pronunciation[edit]

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  • IPA(key): /maɪˈn(j)uːʃ(iː)ə/, /məˈn(j)uːʃ(iː)ə/

Noun[edit]

minutia (plural minutiae or minutiæ)

  1. A minor detail, often of negligible importance.
    They spent all their time on minutiae, never making real progress.
    • 1768, Mr. Yorick [pseudonym; Laurence Sterne], A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy, volume I, 2nd edition, London: T. Becket and P. A. De Hondt, published 1768, page 159:
      I think I can ſee the preciſe and diſtinguiſhing marks of national characters more in theſe nonſenſical minutiæ, than in the moſt important matters of ſtate ; where great men of all nations talk and ſtalk ſo much alike, that I would not give ninepence to chuſe amongſt them.
  2. (biometrics, forensics) Any of the major features of a fingerprint that allow prints to be compared.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Derived from minūtus (diminished).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

minūtia f (genitive minūtiae); first declension

  1. smallness, fineness, minuteness

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative minūtia minūtiae
genitive minūtiae minūtiārum
dative minūtiae minūtiīs
accusative minūtiam minūtiās
ablative minūtiā minūtiīs
vocative minūtia minūtiae

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]