nowt

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English[edit]

A wooden shack in Upton, Vale of White Horse, Oxfordshire, England, UK, for selling cider. At the time the photograph was taken, the shack was closed and had a sign stating "Nowt left in here", indicating to visitors that there was no more cider available.

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Dialectal pronunciation of naught.

Pronoun[edit]

nowt

  1. (Northern England) Naught, nothing.
Synonyms[edit]

Noun[edit]

nowt ‎(uncountable)

  1. (Northern England, Sussex) Naught, nothing.
Derived terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

nowt ‎(not comparable)

  1. (Northern England) Naught, nothing.
Antonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English, from Old Norse. Cognate with Old English nēat.

Noun[edit]

nowt ‎(plural nowts)

  1. (Scotland and Northern England) An ox.
  2. (Scotland and Northern England) A herd of cattle.
  3. (figuratively, Scotland and Northern England) A dumb, crass, or clumsy person, or a person who is difficult or stubborn.
    • 1929, James William Marriott, editor, The Best One-act Plays of 1931[1], G.G. Harrap, published 1932, page 162:
      A hunner guineas for the heid o' that nowt Renwick, and him no' sae very far awa' frae your very nose at this meenit.

References[edit]

  • The New Geordie Dictionary, Frank Graham, 1987, ISBN 0946928118
  • nowt in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, ISBN 1904794165
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [2]
  • Northumberland Words, English Dialect Society, R. Oliver Heslop, 1893–4
  • A List of words and phrases in everyday use by the natives of Hetton-le-Hole in the County of Durham, F.M.T.Palgrave, English Dialect Society vol.74, 1896, [3]
  • Todd's Geordie Words and Phrases, George Todd, Newcastle, 1977[4]

Anagrams[edit]


Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

nowt

  1. (South Scots) naught, nothing

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]