optime

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See also: optimé

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin optimē (very well), in the phrase optimē disputāstī (you have disputed very well), formerly used in reporting results at Cambridge.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

optime (plural optimes)

  1. (Cambridge University) A student who graduates with second class ("senior optime") or third class ("junior optime") honours in mathematics, or (loosely) in any other subject.
    • 1994, Michael J. Crowe, A History of Vector Analysis: The Evolution of the Idea of a Vectorial System, Courier Corporation, →ISBN, page 20:
      The winning of even a single optime was very rare. Upon winning the second optime, Hamilton “became a celebrity in the intellectual circle of Dublin; and invitations, embarrassing from their number, poured in upon him. . .” (2,I; 209)

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin optimus (great).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

optime (plural optimes)

  1. (obsolete, rare) great, optimum

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Interlingua[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

optime

  1. (superlative degree of bon) best

Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Superlative of bene; from optimus (very good) +‎ .

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

optimē

  1. (superlative degree of bene) very well; excellently
  2. thoroughly
  3. most opportunely, just in time
Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Inflected form of optimus (very good).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

optime

  1. vocative masculine singular of optimus

References[edit]

  • optime”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • optime”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • optime in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to deserve well at some one's hands; to do a service to..: bene, praeclare (melius, optime) mereri de aliquo
    • (ambiguous) my dear father: pater optime or carissime, mi pater (vid. sect. XII. 10)
    • (ambiguous) to hope well of a person: bene, optime (meliora) sperare de aliquo (Nep. Milt. 1. 1)
    • (ambiguous) to have the good of the state at heart: bene, optime sentire de re publica
  • Online Latin dictionary, Olivetti

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From opt +‎ -ime; compare Aromanian uptimi.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

optime f (plural optimi)

  1. an eighth (one of eight equal parts of a whole)

Declension[edit]

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

optime

  1. inflection of optimar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative