schola

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin schola.

Noun[edit]

schola ‎(plural scholas)

  1. Originally, a musical school attached to a monastery or church. Also known as a schola cantorum.
  2. Today, a group of musicians, particularly one which specializes in liturgical music.

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek σχολή ‎(skholḗ).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

schola f ‎(genitive scholae); first declension

  1. Leisure time given to learning; schooltime, classtime.
  2. A school; a place for learning or instruction.
    • 1804 Jun 12, Oberdeutsche Allgemeine Litteraturzeitung, No. 70, p. 1119
      non scholæ sed vitæ discendvm est
      We must learn not for school but for life.
  3. A student body; the disciples of a teacher.
  4. A sect; body of followers of a teacher or system, such as the Praetorian guard.
  5. An art gallery.

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative schola scholae
genitive scholae scholārum
dative scholae scholīs
accusative scholam scholās
ablative scholā scholīs
vocative schola scholae

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • schola in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • schola in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • schola in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a school for higher education: schola
    • to go to a school: scholam frequentare
    • to exert oneself in the schools: desudare in scholae umbra or umbraculis
    • a sect, school of thought: schola, disciplina, familia; secta
    • to give lectures: scholas habere, explicare (Fin. 2. 1. 1)
    • to attend lectures: scholis interesse
  • schola in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin