stot

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See also: Stot and stöt

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English stot, stotte (a hack, jade, or worthless horse), in turn from Old Norse stútr. Compare Swedish stut (a bull), Danish stud (an ox). Confer stoat.

Noun[edit]

stot (plural stots)

  1. (obsolete) An inferior horse.
  2. An ox or bull.
  3. (regional) A heifer.

Etymology 2[edit]

Likely derived from Middle Dutch stoten (to push) or Middle Low German stôten, from Proto-Germanic *stautaną (to push, jolt, bump), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)tewd-, from *(s)tew- (to push, hit). Also compare Middle English steten (to thrust, strike, push, knock down), Old Norse stauta and steyta (whence Danish støde), Gothic 𐍃𐍄𐌰𐌿𐍄𐌰𐌽 (stautan), Old Saxon stotan.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

stot (plural stots)

  1. (Scotland, Northern England) A bounce or rebound
    • 1955, Robin Jenkins, The Cone-Gatherers, Canongate 2012, p. 148:
      Instead of dropping the golden cones safely into his bag he let them dribble out of his hands so that, in the expectancy before the violence of the storm, the tiny stots from one transfigured branch to another could be clearly heard.
  2. (zoology, of quadrupeds) A leap using all four legs at once.

Verb[edit]

stot (third-person singular simple present stots, present participle stotting or stottin, simple past and past participle stotted)

  1. (intransitive, Scotland and Northern England) To bounce, rebound or ricochet.
    • 1996, Alasdair Gray, ‘Lack of Money’, Canongate 2012 (Every Short Story 1951-2012), p. 285:
      ‘I've plenty of money in my bank – and I have my cheque book here – could one of you cash a cheque for five pounds? – I promise it won't stot.’
  2. (transitive, Scotland and Northern England) To make bounce, rebound or ricochet.
  3. (transitive, Scotland and Northern England) To stumble.
  4. (intransitive, zoology, of quadrupeds) To leap using all four legs at once.
    Synonym: pronk
    • 1976, Richard Dawkins, The Selfish Gene, Kindle edition, OUP Oxford, published 2016, page 14:
      This vigorous and conspicuous leaping in front of a predator is analogous to bird alarm calls, in that it seems to warn companions of danger while apparently calling the predator’s attention to the stotter himself. We have a responsibility to explain stotting Tommies and all similar phenomena, and this is something I am going to face in later chapters.
  5. (obsolete) To strike, push, shove. [–16th c.]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Likely derived from Middle Dutch stoten, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *stautaną (to push; to jolt; to bump). Also compare Old Norse stauta. Related to Dutch stoten (to push; to bump), German stoßen (to push; to bump; to jolt; to kick; to thrust).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

stot (third-person singular present stots, present participle stottin, past stottit, past participle stottit)

  1. To bounce, rebound, ricochet.

Noun[edit]

stot (plural stots)

  1. A bounce, rebound.

References[edit]