sui generis

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin suī generis (literally of its own kind/class).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sui generis (not comparable)

  1. In a class of its own; one of a kind.
    Synonyms: one of a kind, unique, original
    • 1821–1822, William Hazlitt, “Character of Cobbett”, in Table-Talk; or, Original Essays, volume (please specify |volume=I or II), London: John Warren; Henry Colburn and Co.:
      It is easy to describe second-rate talents, because they fall into a class and enlist under a standard; but first-rate powers defy calculation or comparison, and can be defined only by themselves. They are sui generis, and make the class to which they belong.
    • 1828, Four Discourses on the Sacrifice and Priesthood of Jesus Christ: and on Atonement and Redemption, by John Pye Smith, page 67
      The transcendent case before us is absolutely sui generis.
    • 1874, George P. Marsh, The Earth as Modified by Human Action[1]:
      The eminent Italian geologist, Stoppani, goes further than I had ventured to do, and treats the action of man as a new physical clement altogether sui generis.
    • 1994, Frances and Joseph Gies, “The Technology of the Commercial Revolution”, in Cathedral, Forge, and Waterwheel, →ISBN, page 111:
      The system was neither free enterprise nor socialism; it was sui generis, one of the unique creations of the Middle Ages.
    • 1995, How To Do Things With Words, by J.L. Austin
      We see him as he sees himself, surveying the invisible depths of ethical space, with all the distinction of a specialist in the sui generis.
    • 2015 August 6, Leslie Felperin, “The Diary of a Teenage Girl review – a scaldingly honest coming-of-age comedy”, in The Guardian[2]:
      Based on Phoebe Gloeckner’s remarkable, sui generis semi-autobiographical graphic novel, []
  2. (rarer) By itself; of its own.
    Synonym: per se
    It is nothing to worry about sui generis, but in context of the other factors it's alarming indeed.

Usage notes[edit]

Used as a legal term.

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

sui generis (uncountable)

  1. (proscribed) A thing apart, an isolated specimen.
    (The addition of quotations indicative of this usage is being sought:)

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sui generis.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈzuː.i ˈɡeːnəʁɪs/, /ˈzʊɪ̯-/, /-ˈɡɛnəʁɪs/
  • (file)

Adverb[edit]

sui generis

  1. (sciences, law) sui generis (forming a class of its own)
    Synonym: eigener Art

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin.

Adjective[edit]

sui generis (invariable)

  1. sui generis

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin suī generis (literally of its (own) kind).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌswi ˈxeneɾis/, [ˌswi ˈxe.ne.ɾis]

Adjective[edit]

sui generis (invariable)

  1. sui generis